What can I do with Engineering Physics?

In summary, the three options for specialization are: Nuclear Engineering, Photonics Engineering, and Nano/Micro-Devices Engineering. An EP degree is necessary for careers in space research, but other degrees may be necessary for specific areas of the photonics industry.
  • #1
Gogsey
160
0
Hi, I'm currently doing an undergad in Engineering Physics leading to a BEng degree.
The three option for specialization are:

1). Nuclear Engineering (Nuclear and Particle Physics, Engineering Energy Systems, etc)
2). Photonics Engineering (Optical Instrumentation, Biophotonics, Laser System Applications, Optoelectronics etc)
3) Nano/Micro-Devices Engineering (MEMS, Bio-MEMS, Mechatronics/Robotics, Micro-Robotics, Micro-Fabrication etc)

I'm interested in the photonics stream and was wondering if anyone can tell me what i can do at the BEng level for careers and jobs? Also, where are these jobs found, other than connections from the university (eg. Monster, Workopolis etc)and how can I go about finding them?
 
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  • #2
EP's are usually the guys who crunch numbers for satellites and work for NASA. I know a few who do research for the hopeful manned mission to mars. They are essentially on the leading edge of space research and development.
 
  • #3
Thats awesome. My dream job would be an Aerospace Engineer, just its not too easy to come by a program. If I could aford to live away I would do it at either U of Toronto or Carleton, But I can't. Also I'd be worried about how heavy the mechanics would get too.

What about the photonics industry? Where's the best place to look/find these jobs. Also, what kinda work specifies an engineering physics degree or closely related degree?
 
  • #4
Sorry I'm not educated on the photonics industry.

As for engineering physics, I can tell you as the name implies do a LOT of physics. for some part of their degree they brush against many engineering disciplines. Here is a small sample of my university's EP senior courses.

Microcomputers and Electronic
Instrumentation . . 3
Space Physics . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Engineering Electricity and
Magnetism . 3
Quantum Physics . . . . . 3
Space Systems Design I . . . . . . . 2
Space Systems Design II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Engineering Materials Science . . . . . . . 2
Engineering Materials Science
Laboratory . . . . . . . 1

Many of the jobs you are looking for would certainly reside at many government labs. Take a look at the NSF (National Science Foundation) website to get you started.
 
  • #5
What university is thatÉ I think my university degree layout is quite different from yours. I am at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario.

Here is the layout for after 2nd year in the photonics. These are the specialization courses.

3rd year courses: Application of Photonics, Fundamentals of Physical Optics, Optical Instrumentation.

4th year courses: Optical Communication Systems, Lasera and Electro-optics, Biophotonics, Photonic Devices and Systems.

Actually the last 2 from 4th year are not required, but probably the best technical electives for this stream.

The other 2 streams the similar layout, but requires courses associated with Nuclear engineering and Naon-micro engineering respectively.
 
  • #6
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. The Engineering Physics program here has a 100% job rate.
 

Related to What can I do with Engineering Physics?

1. What is Engineering Physics?

Engineering Physics is an interdisciplinary field that combines principles of physics and engineering to solve real-world problems. It involves the application of scientific and mathematical principles to design, develop, and improve technologies and systems.

2. What career opportunities are available in Engineering Physics?

Graduates with a degree in Engineering Physics have a wide range of career opportunities in various industries, including research and development, aerospace, energy, telecommunications, and electronics. Some common job titles for Engineering Physics graduates include research scientist, design engineer, and systems engineer.

3. What skills are required for a career in Engineering Physics?

In addition to a strong foundation in physics and mathematics, a career in Engineering Physics requires a combination of technical, analytical, and problem-solving skills. It also requires excellent communication and teamwork skills, as most projects involve collaboration with other engineers and scientists.

4. Is a graduate degree necessary for a career in Engineering Physics?

While a bachelor's degree in Engineering Physics can lead to entry-level positions in the field, a graduate degree can provide more opportunities for advancement and higher-paying positions. A master's degree or Ph.D. in a specialized area of Engineering Physics can also lead to research and teaching opportunities.

5. How does Engineering Physics differ from other engineering disciplines?

Engineering Physics differs from other engineering disciplines in that it has a stronger focus on fundamental physics principles and their application to engineering systems. It also involves a more interdisciplinary approach, as it combines knowledge and techniques from various fields of science and engineering.

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