What can I do with a degree in physics/engineering/nuclear

In summary, a BS in physics with focus in nuclear engineering and engineering will likely lead to finding engineering or similar jobs in the nuclear field. However, the career prospects are not as stable as they once were and it is best to assess all your options before making a decision.
  • #1
mike232
39
1
I am almost done with a BS in physics with focus in nuclear engineering and engineering.
My classes have been all the normal BS physics classes as well as nuclear physics with kranes book, two classes with Lamarsh's books on nuclear engineering as well as the blue bible (deuterstadt and Hamilton). I also have classes in ME thermo , fluids , and heat transfer. And i might be taking an ME materials class.

I know I can go to get a MS in nuke engineering, which is what this is mainly designed for, but what kind of jobs are out there for this kind of degree line up? Do i qualify for a job as an ME or similar?

Thankyou for the input.
 
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  • #2
mike232 said:
Do i qualify for a job as an ME or similar?
There are likely engineeing jobs out there that you could do however if the employer asks for someone with an engineering degree they are more likely to hire someone with an engineering degree than a physics degree.
 
  • #3
russ_watters said:
There are likely engineeing jobs out there that you could do however if the employer asks for someone with an engineering degree they are more likely to hire someone with an engineering degree than a physics degree.

Would this exclude me from any mechanical engineering jobs? Is it uncommon to hire physics engineering majors for engineering/similar jobs?
 
  • #4
mike232 said:
Would this exclude me from any mechanical engineering jobs? Is it uncommon to hire physics engineering majors for engineering/similar jobs?
It would not exclude you, it would just make finding a job in that area more difficult. Yes, it is less common to hire physicists than engineers for engineering jobs.
 
  • #5
russ_watters said:
It would not exclude you, it would just make finding a job in that area more difficult. Yes, it is less common to hire physicists than engineers for engineering jobs.

Okay thankyou for the input! Would you be able to point me to a field that would be more likely to hire physicists. I'll say I intend to go to grad school for nuclear engineering but am trying to assess all my options.
 
  • #6
That question I'm less suited to answer...
 
  • #7
Okay, again tha you for your response. I appreciate it.
 
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  • #8
Russ is right, if you want to work as an ME it is best to get the engineering degree.

That said, you could check with the reactor engineering department at the nuclear power stations. They routinely hire physics bachelors. And once you have a job you could migrate towards the more mechanical type work if you're suited for it. A warning though, the careers at the nuclear units are not as steady as they once were. Subject for another thread perhaps.
 

Related to What can I do with a degree in physics/engineering/nuclear

What can I do with a degree in physics?

With a degree in physics, you can pursue a variety of career paths. Some common options include working as a research scientist, a data analyst, a teacher, or a technical writer. You could also work in industries such as healthcare, energy, or aerospace.

What can I do with a degree in engineering?

A degree in engineering can lead to many different career opportunities. Some popular options include working as a mechanical, electrical, or civil engineer. You could also work in a variety of industries, such as manufacturing, construction, or telecommunications.

What can I do with a degree in nuclear engineering?

A degree in nuclear engineering opens up many possibilities for careers in the energy sector. You could work in nuclear power plants, research and development for nuclear technology, or in nuclear medicine. Other options include working in government agencies or consulting firms.

What skills do I need for a career in physics/engineering/nuclear?

Aside from a strong understanding of math and science, careers in physics, engineering, and nuclear often require skills such as critical thinking, problem-solving, and attention to detail. Depending on your specific job, you may also need skills in programming, project management, or communication.

Is a graduate degree necessary for a career in physics/engineering/nuclear?

While a graduate degree can open up more advanced career opportunities, it is not always necessary for entry-level positions in these fields. Many employers value practical experience and on-the-job training as well. It is important to research the specific requirements for the career path you are interested in pursuing.

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