What Can You Do With a Philosophy Degree Besides Law School?

In summary, the conversation discusses the potential career opportunities and benefits of double majoring in Philosophy and Mathematics. It is suggested that a double major will take around five years to complete and can open up various career paths, such as law school. It is also noted that having a Philosophy degree can provide valuable skills such as critical thinking and writing, which can be useful in any line of work.
  • #1
Universe_Man
61
0
I found that someday I would really like to major in Philosophy, but it seems as though there are few careers for it. What can I do with a Philosophy degree?
 
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  • #2
I could pursue a double major I suppose. I like Mathematics alot.
 
  • #3
How much longer does it take to pursue a double major? I don't mind to take the time, but I'd like to know.
 
  • #4
You could always become a wild and crazy guy
http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/exhibitions/online/islands/images/martin.jpg
like this philosophy major.

oh, man, am I dating myself.:redface:
 
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  • #5
You could do what I did; major in math, which is going to take most of your time anyway, and do a minor in philosophy. There are such topics and careers as philosophy of mathematics and philosophy of science. You could also take a lot of history; the point here that math and philosophy give you a certain ivory tower view of people and the world, and popular culture is not deep enough properly to counter it. Nothing is better for that than a cool headed account of what people actually did, and how their different institutions interacted. Avoid sociology and psychology like the plague; those are good fields for some, but with your interests it would only distract you with findings that aren't strong enough to be called either math or philopsophy.
 
  • #6
Having a philosophy degree is not the same as having a physics degree in the sense that it doesn't track you. It doesn't enable your entry into a decently-paying field of work. That doesn't mean it's useless. The ability to read through and comprehend dense texts, to write well and form convincing arguments, and to critically analyze the facts of a given situation are useful skills to have in any line of work. That isn't even to mention the ability to organize thoughts, conduct research, and give presentations and write proposals that you acquire from completing any degree. You won't get any job-specific training the way you will with a hard sciences degree, but that is true of almost field of study that isn't a hard science. All that means is that you'll need to work a little harder to get into a decent line of work right off the bat. It doesn't mean you need to major in a hard science to have any prospects for a decent career. Hell, Woody Allen and Steve Martin were philosophy majors. That's not to say you'll become one of them, but it's obviously enriched their respective senses of humor and helped them to be more insightful and intelligence writers and performers. It can do the same for you no matter what you do to earn a paycheck.
 
  • #7
Universe_Man said:
I found that someday I would really like to major in Philosophy, but it seems as though there are few careers for it. What can I do with a Philosophy degree?

Depending on your interpretation of everything, you could argue, write books and essays, and pretty much make T.V. shows or online bloggs about your beliefs.
 
  • #8
Universe_Man said:
How much longer does it take to pursue a double major? I don't mind to take the time, but I'd like to know.

Because there isn't a large overlap between courses in disciplines like Mathematics and Philosophy, it will probably take you five years to finish. That should be more than adequate time to explore what college has to offer. If you really push it, I suppose you can finish in four, but you might miss out on some other interesting courses. A few course in accounting, finance, and economics are essential IMO, since it'll probably be one of the few opportunities you have in life to gain that kind of knowledge.
 
  • #9
Double majoring sounds nice.
 
  • #10
Hmmm...Forgot to mention.

A lot of philosophy majors go to law school. It's always an option, and let's face it. Philosophy is way better preparation for law than political science.
 

Related to What Can You Do With a Philosophy Degree Besides Law School?

1. What is the job market like for philosophy majors?

The job market for philosophy majors is diverse and ever-changing. While some may assume that a philosophy degree only leads to careers in academia, many philosophy majors go on to work in fields such as law, business, politics, and journalism. The critical thinking and analytical skills gained from studying philosophy can be applied to a wide range of industries and can make philosophy majors competitive candidates for various jobs.

2. Is a philosophy major only for those interested in becoming a philosopher?

No, a philosophy major is not just for those interested in becoming a philosopher. While studying philosophy can certainly lead to a career in academia, many students choose to major in philosophy because of their interest in critical thinking, ethics, and the complexities of human existence. These skills and interests can be applied to a variety of fields and careers, making a philosophy major a versatile and valuable degree.

3. What skills will I gain from studying philosophy?

Studying philosophy can develop a variety of skills that are valuable in both academic and professional settings. These skills include critical thinking, problem-solving, logical reasoning, analytical writing, and the ability to think abstractly and critically about complex issues. These skills can be applied to a wide range of careers, making philosophy majors well-rounded and adaptable individuals.

4. Is philosophy a difficult major?

Like any major, philosophy can be challenging and requires dedication and hard work. However, the difficulty of the major can vary based on individual strengths and interests. Some students may find certain areas of philosophy more challenging than others, but with dedication and strong study habits, a philosophy major can be an enriching and rewarding experience.

5. How does studying philosophy relate to other disciplines?

Studying philosophy can enhance your understanding and perspective of other disciplines. Many philosophical concepts, such as ethics, logic, and metaphysics, can be applied to other fields of study. For example, studying ethics can be beneficial for students interested in law or medicine, while studying logic can be useful for students in fields such as computer science or mathematics. Philosophy can also provide a foundation for critical thinking and analytical skills that can be applied to any field.

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