What if one stand in the middle of a composite boson?

  • Thread starter luxiaolei
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Hi,all.

My lecture said, two fermion can form a composite boson. two spin half plus together get 1.

Yes I agree, but i think thats depend on whose frame of reference.

say A and B is two fermions, C and D is another two fermions (observers). AB form a boson.

if:

AB C

or

ADB

basically, what I want illustrate is, C is far from AB, and D is close to AB.

C can treat AB as whole, i.e a composite boson.

BUT, D can not.


Am I right? helps please!

Thanks in advance
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
ZapperZ
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Hi,all.

My lecture said, two fermion can form a composite boson. two spin half plus together get 1.

Yes I agree, but i think thats depend on whose frame of reference.

say A and B is two fermions, C and D is another two fermions (observers). AB form a boson.

if:

AB C

or

ADB

basically, what I want illustrate is, C is far from AB, and D is close to AB.

C can treat AB as whole, i.e a composite boson.

BUT, D can not.


Am I right? helps please!

Thanks in advance

I'm not sure what you're getting at here.

A composite boson isn't just any two fermions randomly selected. Typically, these two fermions, via some mechanism, form a bound state with each other. Example: the Cooper pairs in conventional superconductors form bound state via phonon exchange.

Unless you are going to argue that such bound state are also "relative", then I don't see how one can confuse on what the constituents of a composite boson is.

Zz.
 

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