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What is the scale or density when the double slit experiment stops working?

  1. Mar 8, 2012 #1

    jaketodd

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    I know even molecules can be used and the result still emerges. What is the density of [pick a type] of atoms or molecules when the experiment stops working? Also, as you increase the density of whatever you're using, does the result get less and less like what you get when you use photons? In other words, is there a gradual loss of the interference pattern as density increases? And like I said, at what density does it actually *stop* working and not resemble an interference pattern at all?

    Thanks!

    Jake
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 15, 2012 #2

    jaketodd

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    Anyone please? I know you experts can answer this ;-)

    Thanks,

    Jake
     
  4. Mar 15, 2012 #3
    Are you sure anyone has figured out the limit?

    Aren't there people preparing to try and send viruses through diffraction gratings to see if an interference pattern is possible?
     
  5. Mar 15, 2012 #4

    jaketodd

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    I've heard that too. I just thought that some of the experts on here would know already. Maybe I'm making a hasty assumption.
     
  6. Mar 15, 2012 #5
    I'm not sure if larger than this has been verified?

    The wave nature of biomolecules and fluorofullerenes
    http://arxiv.org/pdf/quant-ph/0309016v1.pdf
     
  7. Mar 15, 2012 #6

    jaketodd

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    "For C60F48 the observed fringe visibility is below the expected value, but the high contrast still provides good evidence for the quantum character of the observed fringe pattern."

    In other words, the de Broglie wavelength is not a comprehensive rule when it comes to superposition, and they are just saying that some level of superposition still exists for C60F48?

    Thanks,

    Jake
     
  8. Mar 15, 2012 #7
    Yes. You might also find this recent paper by these authors on the topic interesting:
    Quantum interference of large organic molecules
    http://www.nature.com/ncomms/journal/v2/n4/pdf/ncomms1263.pdf
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2012
  9. Mar 16, 2012 #8

    jaketodd

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    Thanks man
     
  10. Mar 28, 2012 #9
    This just came out:
    Real-time single-molecule imaging of quantum interference
    http://www.nature.com/nnano/journal/vaop/ncurrent/pdf/nnano.2012.34.pdf

    Wave Character of Individual Molecules Revealed
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120328090828.htm
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  11. Mar 28, 2012 #10

    jaketodd

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    Thanks again!
     
  12. Mar 30, 2012 #11
    Single molecules in a quantum movie
    http://atomiumculture.eu/content/single-molecules-quantum-movie

    The movie download now available:
    http://www.quantumnano.at/
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2012
  13. Mar 31, 2012 #12
    I can't answer your question, but you might find this interesting:

    http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/49145
     
  14. Mar 31, 2012 #13

    jaketodd

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    Thanks all
     
  15. Apr 7, 2012 #14

    mfb

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    In theory, there should be no limit to the size of the objects. The only limit is the interaction with the environment. But as the objects get heavier and heavier, you have to make them slower and slower to maintain a reasonable wavelength. This means that the particles have more time to interact, they have more atoms which can interact and smaller interactions can disturb them at the same time.

    Simple answer: the molecule.
     
  16. Apr 7, 2012 #15
    As some other posters, I don't think there is any limit on the mass of diffracting objects. Please see the reasoning in https://www.physicsforums.com/showpost.php?p=3724011&postcount=8
     
  17. Apr 9, 2012 #16
    there isnt one.
    it never stops working
    no matter what size you use
     
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