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I What non-polynomial functions can be "factored"?

  1. Apr 14, 2016 #1
    hi, and thanks for come in, sorry for bad english :frown:

    I was watching a proof of euler to the basilean problem, and a part of the proof he did this

    sin(x) = x ( x + π ) ( x - π ) ( x + 2π ) ( x - 2π ) ( x + 3π ) ( x - 3π) ...

    i understand why, but i wanted to know what not polynomial functions they have this property and how
    "factored" this functions.

    also wanted to know if all periodic functions have this property.

    by last
    this is true?

    cos(x) = ( x + π/2 ) ( x - π/2 ) ( x + π3/2 ) ( x - π3/2 ) ( x + π5/2) ( x - π5/2 ) ....

    thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 14, 2016 #2

    micromass

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  4. Apr 14, 2016 #3
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