What really causes electromagnetic induction/ the motor effect?

In summary, an electric wire in a changing magnetic field experiences a Lorentz force, which is determined by the electric and magnetic fields present. This force causes the movement of electrons in the wire, creating an electric current. At the most fundamental level, this phenomenon is known as the "Hole Charge." The stability of the metal used in the wire affects its conductivity, with gold being one of the best conductors due to its resistance to oxidation.
  • #1
henpen
50
0
When a conducting wire is subjected to a changing magnetic field, what causes the electrons in this wire to move?
Conversely, why does the movement of current in the wire (with a non-'moving' magnetic field) cause the wire to move?
I understand these phenomena macroscopically (and that they are different sides of the same electromagnetic coin), but at the most fundamental level, what happens?
 
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  • #2
I believe the idea is a called a "Hole Charge."

I don't know exact chemistry of conductors, but basically, they are usually fairly stable.

Electricity is more of a pulling effect.

When you pull one of the electrons from one end of the wire, those atoms pull electrons from neighboring atoms and the "effort" travels up the wire. The "effort" is near the speed of light. The electrons themselves do not travel at the speed of light. In fact, the more they have to travel, the more heat it causes and resistance builds up.

Thus A/C is more efficient then D/C.

The more stable the metal, the better conductor is it makes. For example: Gold is one of the best conductors and does not oxidize like many others. At least, I think so.
 
  • #3
Fundamentally, a charge experiences the Lorentz force, period. The E and B fields at the charge determine that force.

Note that a changing magnetic field creates an electric field. That's one of the fields that exerts a force on the charge in the case of a time-changing magnetic field.

Every one of Lord Challen's observations is incorrect.
 
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Related to What really causes electromagnetic induction/ the motor effect?

1. What is electromagnetic induction and how does it work?

Electromagnetic induction is the process by which an electric current is produced in a conductor when it is exposed to a changing magnetic field. This can be achieved by either moving a magnet near a stationary conductor or by moving a conductor near a stationary magnet. The changing magnetic field induces a current in the conductor, according to Faraday's law of induction.

2. What is the motor effect and how is it related to electromagnetic induction?

The motor effect is the phenomenon where a current-carrying conductor experiences a force when placed in a magnetic field. This is directly related to electromagnetic induction as the current in the conductor is induced by the changing magnetic field, and the force experienced by the conductor is a result of the interaction between the magnetic field and the current.

3. What factors affect the strength of electromagnetic induction/ the motor effect?

The strength of electromagnetic induction and the motor effect depends on several factors, including the strength of the magnetic field, the speed at which the conductor or magnet is moving, the angle between the magnetic field and the conductor, and the number of turns in the conductor. The greater these factors, the stronger the induction and motor effect will be.

4. What are the practical applications of electromagnetic induction/ the motor effect?

Electromagnetic induction and the motor effect have many practical applications in our everyday lives. Some examples include generators, transformers, electric motors, and induction cooktops. These technologies rely on the principles of electromagnetic induction and the motor effect to function.

5. How is electromagnetic induction/ the motor effect related to electricity and magnetism?

Electromagnetic induction and the motor effect are closely related to electricity and magnetism. They demonstrate the fundamental connection between these two phenomena and how they can interact with each other. Without the understanding of electricity and magnetism, we would not be able to explain or utilize electromagnetic induction and the motor effect in modern technology.

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