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Engineering What type of engineer works in the most interesting places?

  1. Sep 2, 2016 #1
    I'm trying to decide which sort of engineering I want to do. I am leaning towards mechanical, what are examples of environments where mechanical engineers can work?

    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 2, 2016 #2

    billy_joule

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    Science Advisor

    Office, workshop, laboratory, manufacturing plant, oil rig, aeroplane, construction site, underground mine, chemical plant etc etc they're the same places other engineers work too.
    You'll need a more specific question if you want useful answers.
     
  4. Sep 2, 2016 #3

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    Agreed. More info would be helpful. What kinds of places do you like to visit?

    I'm an EE and have been many places, both for conferences where I was presenting, and for customer visits where I was helping to debug problems. There was the time I was hanging upside-down outside a train in a snowstorm with a portable oscilloscope trying to debug noise issues on the train's intelligent network. Would that be fun for you? o0)

    I think the best answer to your thread title question "What type of engineer works in the most interesting places?" is "Consulting Engineer". But you will need a lot of experience as a regular engineer before you can go out on your own as a Consulting Engineer. As a consultant, you can choose what clients you work for (if you are very good at what you do), and you can choose where you work.

    work hard! :smile:
     
  5. Sep 15, 2016 #4
    Can you be a field engineer with a degree?
     
  6. Sep 15, 2016 #5

    berkeman

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    Sure. Without a degree would be hard...
     
  7. Sep 15, 2016 #6
    What about a field service engineer? (I meant to say).
     
  8. Sep 15, 2016 #7

    berkeman

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    I'm not sure what that is, but with "engineer" in the title, I'd assume that a 4-year engineering degree is required. And for Field Service Technician, a 2-year Engineering Technology degree would probably be required.

    I'm more familiar with the term Field Application Engineer -- those are engineers with a 4-year degree and good experience in the products they support. They help customers in the field with developing their (high-volume hopefully) applications based on the company's products. They also help (important) customers with debugging problems in the field. Working as an FAE can be interesting, depending on the product line, but it can also be very stressful at times.
     
  9. Sep 15, 2016 #8
    You should find out what your core Interest is and follow that , it may be cars , engines , jet engines or simple machines , if your passion has a specific engineering course make sure you take that up , if you take up mechanical engineering you have a wider set of options to look up to as a mechanical engineer, you will learn all the basic principles of mechanical engineering in 4 years and then will have the opportunity to working in any field that required a mechanical engineer. More over your ideas and passion can keep changing with time when you learn you subject that interest you
     
  10. Sep 15, 2016 #9
    Field service engineers do things like maintenance, repair, installation etc., as the name would imply. And a bachelors degree takes 3 years here (England).
     
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