What would happen to pauli exclusion principle

In summary, the Pauli exclusion principle states that no two electrons can occupy the same state. This is based on the fact that the total wavefunction for a system of electrons must be antisymmetric. Even when forced to occupy the same state, the electrons can come very close but not exactly in the same position. When electrons are sucked into a black hole, there is no violation of the Pauli exclusion principle or conservation of energy, as the universe outside the event horizon gains energy while the black hole loses it. This suggests that matter entering the black hole may be converted to energy and is no longer a fermion.
  • #1
Bose
25
0
Pauli exclusion principle say that no two electrons can occupy the same state. But what would happen if we force them to occupy the same states?
 
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  • #2
No two electrons can occupy the same state. Therefore your two cows *AHEM* electrons don't exist.
 
  • #3
The pauli exclusion principle ultimately comes from the fact that the total wavefunction for a system of electrons must be antisymmetric. So, for example, if I have two electrons (with coordinates r1 and r2, respectively) and two states [itex]\phi[/itex] and [tex]\chi[/tex] the the total wavefunction would be
[tex]
\Psi_{\rm tot}(r_1,r_2)=\frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}\left(\phi(r1)\chi(r2)-\chi(r1)\phi(r2)\right)\;.
[/tex]

so now, you tell me... what happens if the electrons are in the same state (i.e., if [itex]\phi=\chi[/itex])
 
  • #4
Can't put two fermions in the same state, but you can come very close. That is, for 2 spin up electrons, one could be at x=1.0, and another at 1.000000000000000001. Of course the electrostatic repulsive force between the two would make the assemblage difficult.
Regards,
Reilly Atkinson
 
  • #5
When electrons or other fermions are sucked into a black hole, are they converted to energy? Otherwise, how is the PEP not violated then by the singularity?
 
  • #6
peter0302 said:
When electrons or other fermions are sucked into a black hole, are they converted to energy? Otherwise, how is the PEP not violated then by the singularity?

AFAIK there is no violation of PEP, let alone conservation of energy. The universe outside of the event horizon gains energy and the black hole loses it. Net gain/loss to the universe 0.
 
  • #7
That doesn't answer the question. How does matter get packed into a single point in space without violating the PEP? The only thing I can conclude is everything that goes into the black hole gets abosrobed as energy and therefore is no longer a fermion.
 

1. What is the Pauli Exclusion Principle?

The Pauli Exclusion Principle is a fundamental principle in physics that states that no two identical fermions can occupy the same quantum state simultaneously. This means that two fermions, such as electrons, cannot have the same set of quantum numbers, including energy, spin, and angular momentum, within an atom.

2. How does the Pauli Exclusion Principle affect electron configuration?

The Pauli Exclusion Principle dictates the rules for electron configuration in atoms. It states that electrons must occupy different orbitals with different spin states, leading to the familiar electron configurations seen in the periodic table.

3. What would happen if the Pauli Exclusion Principle was violated?

If the Pauli Exclusion Principle was violated, it would lead to a breakdown of the fundamental laws of physics. Electron configurations would change, and atoms would behave in ways that are currently considered impossible. The existence of matter, as we know it, would be impossible without the Pauli Exclusion Principle.

4. How does the Pauli Exclusion Principle affect the behavior of electrons in metals?

The Pauli Exclusion Principle plays a crucial role in the behavior of electrons in metals. It explains why metals are good conductors of electricity, as the free electrons in the metal can move around without violating the principle. It also contributes to the properties of metals such as malleability and ductility.

5. Can the Pauli Exclusion Principle be applied to particles other than electrons?

Yes, the Pauli Exclusion Principle applies to all fermions, not just electrons. This includes protons, neutrons, and other subatomic particles. It also applies to composite particles made up of an odd number of fermions, such as atoms with an odd number of protons or neutrons.

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