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Which engineering is most hands on?

  1. Jan 16, 2008 #1
    :cry: forgive me i know theres tons of these types of threads but in which type will the design engineer prototype as well?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 16, 2008 #2
    Probably mechanical or electrical/computer
     
  4. Jan 16, 2008 #3
    anyone else?
     
  5. Jan 17, 2008 #4
    Electrical is a good one - you get to prototype and design circuits in the lab if you'd like, using breadboards and real parts OR use simulation software. Depends on the scneario.
     
  6. Jan 17, 2008 #5
    No doubt about this!!!! The Agricultural Engineers are the most hands on, bar none!!! We do lots of labs, and have a ton of clubs/groups! And, to be honest....we are called power and machinery engineers, but we are basically a mechanical engineer(take nearly the exact same courses, but just more hands on)
     
  7. Jan 17, 2008 #6

    chroot

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    Most forms of electrical and computer engineering are done solely on computers. If that's "hands-on" to you then great, but most people don't consider it so.

    Civil and mechanical are generally the most hands-on.

    - Warren
     
  8. Jan 22, 2008 #7
    Just a general observation from a physicist working in medical device engineering: I think alot of folks who go into engineering as career are surprised to find out that most of their time is spent doing things that are very different from what their initial idea of "engineering" is. For example, in highly regulated industries such as medical device, aerospace, military, etc. an engineer spends an enormous amount of time simply following the usually very rigid processes created by their Quality System. Lots of time is spent working on documentation and configuration control. If you come from a research background (PhD condensed matter for me) where you are used to spending your time somewhat creatively, this can be a very rude awakening.
     
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