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Which equation would you tattoo in your body?

  1. Apr 12, 2012 #1
    Write your equation and a reason why would you tattoo it in your body.

    Not necessarily means that you are going to do it. This is just an imaginary situation. Please just write a comment answering the question above, if do not, just do not write other kind of commentaries. I do not want this to become a discussion about if you would do or do not do a tattoo of equations.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2012
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 12, 2012 #2
    Re: Which equation would you tatto in your body?

    None. And if I did get a tattoo, it wouldn't be an equation, cause I'd think people would think I'm trying too hard to look smart. And it would be pretty awkward when they find out that I'm not smart.
     
  4. Apr 12, 2012 #3

    turbo

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    Re: Which equation would you tatto in your body?

    I had better be one that you understand quite well, so you can explain it without trouble. (Just a suggestion.) And it should be concise. Not a great idea to have Einstein's Field equations tattooed on your back, unless you trust the artist not to screw up the notation...
     
  5. Apr 12, 2012 #4
    Re: Which equation would you tatto in your body?

    I changed the post, please read it again. I am sorry that I did not specify.
     
  6. Apr 12, 2012 #5

    micromass

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    Not that I would ever do it (sorry to the OP :smile: ),but if I would then it would be

    [tex]\sum_{p~\text{prime}}\frac{1}{1-p^{-2}} = \frac{\pi^2}{6}[/tex]

    This my favorite math formula because it relates two (apparent) complete distinct fields of mathematics.

    On the left, we have the prime numbers. They have to do with number theory and arithmetic.
    On the left, we have [itex]\pi[/itex] which comes from geometry.

    There is nothing which suggests why these two could be related. But they are!! These deep and surprising connection on math is what makes it such a beautiful field to study.
     
  7. Apr 12, 2012 #6

    phyzguy

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    I think you mean:
    [tex] \prod_{p-prime}\frac{1}{1-p^{-2}} = \frac{\pi^2}{6}[/tex]
     
  8. Apr 12, 2012 #7

    micromass

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    Of course I did :redface: Imagine me getting a tattoo of the sum version...
     
  9. Apr 12, 2012 #8
    Re: Which equation would you tatto in your body?

    Ok, I should have known that's what you meant.

    On one hand, I would want a cool looking one, but on the other hand, I would want something that means a lot to me.
    The quadratic formula and the pathagorean formula are the simplest ones that have been most useful to me, so I would probably get either one of those.
    Or I would get that one formula which includes e, pi, and i, which is pretty cool.
     
  10. Apr 12, 2012 #9
    Re: Which equation would you tatto in your body?

    ei π = -1

    I've always liked that one.

    The fundamental theorem of calculus might be cool.

    I'll think about it more, not that I'd ever get a math tattoo though. I'd almost be inclined to pick one that looks intricate / pretty rather than one of the famous equations like Euler.
     
  11. Apr 12, 2012 #10
  12. Apr 12, 2012 #11

    Integral

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    My avatar
     
  13. Apr 12, 2012 #12
    [itex]\nabla \cdot \vec{B}=\rho_{0}[/itex]

    This would be nice, even if it is not true.
     
  14. Apr 12, 2012 #13
    <<- i is not real ->>
    Meaning Re(i) = 0.
     
  15. Apr 13, 2012 #14

    jhae2.718

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    Not the tattoo type, but perhaps:
    [tex]C_{m_{\alpha}} = -C_{l_{\alpha}}\left(\bar{x}_{AC}-\bar{x}_{CG}\right)[/tex]
    or
    [tex]\frac{^\mathcal{N}\mathrm{d}}{\mathrm{d}t}\mathbf{r} = \frac{^\mathcal{B}\mathrm{d}}{\mathrm{d}t}\mathbf{r} + \boldsymbol{\omega}_{\mathcal{B}/\mathcal{N}} \times \mathbf{r}[/tex]
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2012
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