Which is the best book for quantum physics?

  • #1
In our BS Hons course, we stumbled upon quantum physics. This aforementioned topic is, if not, completely new to me. Therefore, for a better understanding and easy to understand book is necessary; not compromising on the mathematical side though.
 

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  • #2
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not compromising on the mathematical side though.
What do you mean with this? If I read this, I would immediately think of a book that goes into C*-algebras, functional analysis and rigged Hilbert spaces. None of this is "easy to understand". So you need to be very careful and very precise in what you want.
 
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  • #3
Quantum Physics for Dummies
 
  • #5
What do you mean with this? If I read this, I would immediately think of a book that goes into C*-algebras, functional analysis and rigged Hilbert spaces. None of this is "easy to understand". So you need to be very careful and very precise in what you want.
I meant a book which is written in clear , straightforward English... That would enable me to comprehend easily the postulates and theories along with the Mathematics..
 
  • #6
vanhees71
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J. J. Sakurai, Modern Quantum Mechanics
 
  • #7
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  1. Perhaps start with some history to see te need for the theory? The most simple but basic: Polkinghorne: quantum theory, a very short introduction (5 Hours read if you're into some physics)
  2. Gary Bowman: Essential quantum mechanics. Starts you off with the postulates and learns you formalism and bra-ket in no-time.
  3. Dirac: The principes of quantum mechanics (if you can't get enough)
Btw: Polkinghorne was a student of Dirac.
Enjoy
 
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  • #8
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A Modern Approach to Quantum Mechanics by Townsend is pretty good. I've heard it described as an undergrad-Sakurai, but I admit I've never used Sakurai.
 
  • #9
  1. Perhaps start with some history to see te need for the theory? The most simple but basic: Polkinghorne: quantum theory, a very short introduction (5 Hours read if you're into some physics)
  2. Gary Bowman: Essential quantum mechanics. Starts you off with the postulates and learns you formalism and bra-ket in no-time.
  3. Dirac: The principes of quantum mechanics (if you can't get enough)
Btw: Polkinghorne was a student of Dirac.
Enjoy
Thanks
 
  • #10
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I am assuming you already know calculus including differential equations.

1. You need a good foundation of linear Algebra from something like
Linear Algebra as an Introduction to Abstract Mathematics by Schilling
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/9814723770/?tag=pfamazon01-20&tag=pfamazon01-20

If you can do without a printed copy, the book is available for free here
https://www.math.ucdavis.edu/~anne/linear_algebra/

Pick any decent linear algebra book that does not skimp on vector spaces.

2. Read susskind to get a decent, modern, but not too rigorous overview
https://www.amazon.com/dp/0465062903/?tag=pfamazon01-20&tag=pfamazon01-20

Here are the matching video lectures.
http://theoreticalminimum.com/courses/quantum-mechanics/2012/winter

3. Read McIntyre to get an excellent first course that uses the spins-first approach
https://www.amazon.com/dp/0321765796/?tag=pfamazon01-20&tag=pfamazon01-20

In my opinion the spins first approach is the easiest and yet most modern way to learn Quantum mechanics.

The Townsend and Sakurai books mentioned above use the same approach. I like McIntyre the best though. But any of the three will do.

The Bowman book mentioned above, although does not use a spins first approach strictly, is also a very good and short introduction.
 
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  • #11
dextercioby
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  1. Perhaps start with some history to see te need for the theory? The most simple but basic: Polkinghorne: quantum theory, a very short introduction (5 Hours read if you're into some physics)
  2. Gary Bowman: Essential quantum mechanics. Starts you off with the postulates and learns you formalism and bra-ket in no-time.
  3. Dirac: The principes of quantum mechanics (if you can't get enough)
Btw: Polkinghorne was a student of Dirac.
Enjoy
1. OK. 2. Very good!. 3. Dirac's book is a very tough read (almost like reading von Neumann's book), so I would go for a more modern writing. Sakurai's text is lucid and up to the point without too fancy mathematics and is definitely inspired from Dirac's book but with a modern notation.
 
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  • #12
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I highly recommend Shankar's QM(1) Book, it undergraduate/beginning graduate level, starts off with a chapter on the linear algebra that you need ( using Dirac's bra-ket notation), and then after a quick review of classical mechanics, proceeds to build the theory from the 'postulates' of Quantum mechanics. It has everything you need for a first course in quantum mechanics, and more, such as two chapters on path integrals and a chapter on Dirac equation, moreover, there are solutions to selected exercises at the end.
A book that goes well with Shankar's QM is Zettilli's QM book(2), it has a lot of solved problems and many problems at the end of each chapter to solidify your understanding of the subject matter.
1) https://www.amazon.com/dp/0306447908/?tag=pfamazon01-20&tag=pfamazon01-20.
2)https://www.amazon.com/dp/0470026790/?tag=pfamazon01-20&tag=pfamazon01-20
 
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  • #13
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Thank you for all the information people.
 

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