Which Liquid Requires More Volume to Conceal a Coin: Oil or Water?

In summary, total internal reflection is a phenomenon that occurs when a ray of light is completely reflected back into a dense medium due to a difference in density and refractive index between two mediums. It is used in various applications and can only occur when light travels from a more dense medium to a less dense medium. The critical angle is the specific angle at which total internal reflection occurs.
  • #1
jakey
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Question on total reflection...if you were to conceal a coin, by putting it under a beaker whose lid is covered with foil, and you slowly add a liquid until the coin seemingly disappears, which would require a greater volume? oil or water?
 
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  • #2
Do you mean a coin in dip of a pool? If it is, answer is oil for the same color of light. When light cross to air(minor indice) will far a way from normal. Thus come closer to distinctive surface. Much flux of indice, much far a way from normal.
 
  • #3


Total Internal Reflection is a phenomenon that occurs when a light ray traveling through a dense medium, such as glass, reaches the boundary with a less dense medium, such as air, at an angle greater than the critical angle. In this case, the light is completely reflected back into the denser medium, instead of being refracted into the less dense medium. This effect is used in various applications, such as optical fibers, prisms, and mirages.

To answer the question on total reflection, if a coin is concealed by placing it under a beaker whose lid is covered with foil and then slowly adding a liquid until the coin disappears, the volume of the liquid required would depend on the refractive index of the liquid. This is because the critical angle for total internal reflection depends on the refractive indices of the two mediums involved. The greater the difference in refractive indices, the smaller the critical angle and the more likely total internal reflection will occur.

In this scenario, if the coin is placed in a beaker filled with oil, which has a lower refractive index than water, a greater volume of oil would be required to achieve total internal reflection. This is because the critical angle for oil is smaller than that of water, meaning that the light would be more likely to be reflected back into the oil instead of being refracted into the air, making the coin appear to disappear.

In contrast, if the coin is placed in a beaker filled with water, which has a higher refractive index than oil, a smaller volume of water would be required to achieve total internal reflection. This is because the critical angle for water is larger than that of oil, making it less likely for total internal reflection to occur.

In conclusion, the volume of liquid required to achieve total internal reflection and conceal the coin would depend on the refractive index of the liquid. A liquid with a higher refractive index, such as water, would require a smaller volume compared to a liquid with a lower refractive index, such as oil.
 

Related to Which Liquid Requires More Volume to Conceal a Coin: Oil or Water?

1. What is total internal reflection?

Total internal reflection is a phenomenon in which a ray of light traveling through a dense medium, such as glass or water, is completely reflected back into the medium when it reaches the boundary with a less dense medium, such as air. This occurs when the angle of incidence of the ray is greater than the critical angle, causing the light to be unable to pass through the boundary and instead bounce back into the medium.

2. What causes total internal reflection?

Total internal reflection is caused by the difference in density and refractive index between two mediums. When a ray of light reaches the boundary between two mediums, it can either be reflected or refracted depending on the angle of incidence and the difference in refractive index. If the angle of incidence is large enough, the light will be reflected back into the same medium, resulting in total internal reflection.

3. Where is total internal reflection used?

Total internal reflection is used in various applications, such as optical fibers, prisms, and binoculars. It is also used in technology such as endoscopes and periscopes to transmit light without losing intensity. In nature, total internal reflection is responsible for the shimmering effect seen in certain gemstones, such as diamonds, and the sparkle in a fish's scales.

4. Can total internal reflection occur in all mediums?

No, total internal reflection can only occur when light travels from a more dense medium to a less dense medium. For example, it can occur in glass to air or water to air, but not in air to glass or air to water.

5. How is total internal reflection related to critical angle?

The critical angle is the angle of incidence at which total internal reflection occurs. It is a specific angle for each boundary between two mediums and is determined by the difference in refractive index between the two mediums. If the angle of incidence is larger than the critical angle, total internal reflection will occur. If it is smaller, the light will be refracted instead.

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