Why acetaldehyde has a higher boiling point than ethylamine?

In summary, acetaldehyde has a higher boiling point than ethylamine due to its larger molecular weight and stronger intermolecular forces, specifically dipole-dipole interactions and London dispersion forces. These forces are weaker in ethylamine, which only has London dispersion forces. The structure of acetaldehyde, including the presence of a carbonyl group and the arrangement of atoms, contributes to its higher boiling point. The boiling point of ethylamine cannot be increased to match that of acetaldehyde due to the different molecular structures and resulting intermolecular forces.
  • #1
jaumzaum
434
33
Ethylamine has 2 hydrogen bonds, Acethaldehyde has no one, so why the second has a higher boiling point?
 
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  • #2
Is hydrogen bonding the only intermolecular force of consequence in this situation?

How effectively can ethylamine hydrogen bond with itself? It has a lone pair on the nitrogen to serve as an H-bond acceptor, and has two amine hydrogens that can be donated.

How large of a difference is there between the two boiling points?
 
  • #3
The boiling points are very close:
Acetaldehyde 68ºF
Ethylamine: 62ºF
 

Related to Why acetaldehyde has a higher boiling point than ethylamine?

1. Why does acetaldehyde have a higher boiling point than ethylamine?

Acetaldehyde has a higher boiling point than ethylamine because it has a higher molecular weight and stronger intermolecular forces. This means that more energy is required to break the bonds between acetaldehyde molecules, causing it to have a higher boiling point.

2. What are the intermolecular forces present in acetaldehyde?

The intermolecular forces present in acetaldehyde are dipole-dipole interactions and London dispersion forces. The oxygen atom in the carbonyl group of acetaldehyde is highly electronegative, creating a dipole moment that allows for these strong intermolecular forces.

3. How do the intermolecular forces differ between acetaldehyde and ethylamine?

The intermolecular forces in acetaldehyde are stronger than those in ethylamine due to the presence of dipole-dipole interactions and a larger molecular weight. Ethylamine has weaker intermolecular forces consisting of only London dispersion forces.

4. Does the structure of acetaldehyde contribute to its higher boiling point?

Yes, the structure of acetaldehyde plays a significant role in its higher boiling point. The presence of a carbonyl group and the arrangement of atoms in the molecule allow for stronger intermolecular forces and a higher boiling point.

5. Can the boiling point of ethylamine be increased to match that of acetaldehyde?

No, the boiling point of ethylamine cannot be increased to match that of acetaldehyde. The strength of intermolecular forces is determined by the molecular structure, and ethylamine does not have the same structural components as acetaldehyde to allow for stronger forces.

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