Why Do Noble Gases Remain in a Gaseous State?

In summary, the noble gases stay in a gas state because their atoms have maximum number of valence electrons and the electrons repel each other, making it difficult for them to form molecules and become a solid or liquid. This distinguishes them from other elements, whose atoms also have repelling electrons.
  • #1
gateman234
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0

Homework Statement


why do the noble gases stay at a gas state whe almost every other element in the period doesnt?

The Attempt at a Solution


because the elctrons repel each other? i don't know
 
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  • #2
gateman234 said:
because the elctrons repel each other? i don't know

Maybe. I'm not sure too, but it's probably very difficult to bring the atoms of these gases together, because the electrons repel each other (and they won't make any molecules because they already have maximum number of valence electrons).
 
  • #3
Yes, the electrons repel each other, but the electrons of other elements also repel each other. How are the atoms of noble elements different from other elements? That's the key.
 

Related to Why Do Noble Gases Remain in a Gaseous State?

1. Why are noble gases called "noble"?

Noble gases are called "noble" because they were initially thought to be chemically inert and not react with other elements, making them seem superior or "noble" compared to other elements.

2. What makes noble gases unique?

Noble gases have a full outer electron shell, making them stable and unreactive. This is due to their electronic configuration, which does not allow them to gain or lose electrons easily.

3. Why do noble gases stay gaseous at room temperature?

Noble gases stay gaseous at room temperature because they have weak interatomic forces, which means the atoms do not bond together tightly. This allows them to move freely and easily as a gas.

4. Can noble gases become solid or liquid?

Noble gases can become solid or liquid under extreme conditions, such as very low temperatures or high pressures. However, these conditions are not present at room temperature, so they remain gaseous.

5. Are there any practical applications for noble gases staying gaseous?

Yes, there are several practical applications for noble gases staying gaseous. For example, helium is used in balloons because it is lighter than air and does not react with other elements. Neon is used in neon lights because it produces a bright, colorful light. Argon is used in light bulbs to prevent the filament from oxidizing. These are just a few examples of the many practical applications of noble gases staying gaseous.

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