Why do some people not get the Common Cold?

  • Thread starter Shadowmaru
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In summary: I attribute my immunity to the fact that I live in a place where the environment fluctuates a lot more than it does in Ohio and Nebraska.I think the answer lies in your own speculations.In summary, Subject A has a form of Rhino/Corona Virus. Subject A sneezes into my mouth and the Virus enters my system. Although, it seems to inflame my Pericardium, which sets off my Pericarditis for a day or two, Subject A does not feel effects. I suspect the answer lies in your own speculations.
  • #1
Shadowmaru
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Sorry if this is in the wrong place, not sure where else to put it.

Something has been puzzling me for a few years, I developed Pericarditis which is now recurrent on and off about 4-5 years ago.

Ever since then, I have not had a bout of the Common Cold. If someone close to me has the Common Cold, I don't get it.

Although, it seems to inflame my Pericardium, which sets off my Pericarditis for a day or two.

Everyone around me can have the cold and will become infected, partner, parents, siblings - especially at this time of year have all come down with the Common Cold and became ill, but not me?

I am not sure why really, but I have done some research and been led to believe, once the virus enters my system, my antibodies identify it instantly and carry it off to the Pericardium, where it is destroyed, hence why my Pericarditis flares up and my Heart Sac inflames.

I do have other immune issues too, like Geographical Tongue, which is present every day.

I have tried to look at some studies, but keep coming up trumps!

I'm thinking of doing one of those research programs where they infect you with a cold virus to study it, and see if I actually do get the cold.

Anyone offer an insight ?

Again - apologies if this is in the wrong place.
 
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  • #2
First properly name 'the common cold', they are a hundred types of Rhinovirus (plus a few others) an the most common of human illnesses.
 
  • #3
Without getting it all over complicated, I would be referring to the more "common" type during any season of the year.

Specifically, Rhino & Corona groups. I understand there is over 200 different types.

I'll try to make it easier to understand.

Subject A has a form of Rhino/Corona Virus. Subject A sneezes into my mouth and the Virus enters my system.

I don't feel effects.
 
  • #4
I suspect the answer lies in your own speculations.

When you are infected with virus, you don't "catch a cold" - you have a virus and that results in a set of symptoms. Different people have different symptoms when exposed to the same virus. That's why some people get a nose that won't stop running, and others get a sinus headache, and others get a hacking cough, etc. Maybe a flare up of your pericarditis is just how your body tends to react now. Maybe you're immune system is stronger than the average bear's. So it's quite possible you're infected and a carrier, but the (typical) symptoms just haven't been strong enough to warrant any attention.
 
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I think it's just a combination of variations between each person's natural immune system and environment.

Living in Ohio and Nebraska, I tended to catch colds with the first cold weather spell in the late fall and the first warming spell in the spring. I'd never catch colds in the middle of winter. I'd catch a cold when visiting Louisiana or California regardless of the time of year I visited. I think the climate variations lessened my immunity.

Living in Colorado and Alaska, I practically never catch a cold regardless of the season or the weather (both Colorado and Alaska have very dry climates - even the snow in Colorado tends to be light and dry vs the heavy wet snow that falls near the Great Lakes).
 

Related to Why do some people not get the Common Cold?

1. Why do some people not get the Common Cold?

Some people may not get the common cold because they have a strong immune system that is able to fight off the virus before it causes symptoms. Others may have been exposed to the virus before and have built up immunity to it.

2. Is it possible to be immune to the Common Cold?

Yes, it is possible to be immune to the common cold. This can happen through exposure to the virus, either through previous infections or through vaccinations. It is also possible for some people to have a genetic predisposition for immunity to certain viruses.

3. Why do children seem to get the Common Cold more often than adults?

Children may get the common cold more often than adults because their immune systems are still developing and may not be as strong as adults'. Children are also more likely to come into contact with the virus in places like schools and daycare centers.

4. Can lifestyle factors affect the likelihood of getting the Common Cold?

Yes, lifestyle factors such as stress, sleep patterns, and diet can affect the likelihood of getting the common cold. Stress can weaken the immune system, making it easier for viruses to infect the body. Lack of sleep and poor diet can also weaken the immune system, making a person more susceptible to infections.

5. Is it possible to prevent the Common Cold?

While there is no guaranteed way to prevent the common cold, there are steps you can take to reduce your risk. These include washing your hands regularly, avoiding close contact with sick individuals, and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Additionally, getting a flu vaccine can also help boost your immune system and potentially provide some protection against the common cold.

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