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Why does the moon look full in my photos,...

  1. Feb 15, 2016 #1
    ...so close to the Sun's position? Is this even possible?

    First two, taken around May 1st, 2015.
    Last one, taken in October, 2015
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 15, 2016 #2

    fresh_42

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    Could it be Venus?
     
  4. Feb 15, 2016 #3

    davenn

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    hi Jessica
    welcome to PF :smile:

    I mis-read your post

    that bright spot to the side is likely to be just lens flare ( reflections within the lens system)

    you shouldn't be pointing an unprotected lens / camera at the sun
    it's a good way to damage things including your eyesight


    Dave
     
  5. Feb 16, 2016 #4
    It's the moon. I saw it was before I took the picture. I always take pictures of the moon during the day because my camera isn't good enough to catch planets or other stars, unless it is very dark out. Even then, it doesn't catch much else.
     
  6. Feb 16, 2016 #5

    It's the moon.

    << Post edited by Mentor >>
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 16, 2016
  7. Feb 16, 2016 #6

    Bandersnatch

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  8. Feb 16, 2016 #7

    davenn

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    So if you really think this is the moon

    of course it's possible for it to be that close in the sky to the sun
    the moon occasionally goes in front of the sun to produce a solar eclipse

    you are really very silly ... highly dangerous activity



    Dave
     
  9. Feb 16, 2016 #8

    davenn

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    no, think about it ....

    when the moon is that close to the sun ... it's close to the new moon phase and it isn't seen, even with earthshine
    we only dimly see earthshine during twilight and darker hours and no way is it bright enough to light up that moon that bright during the day to compete with the brightness of the sun in the sky ... aint going to happen !! period

    I personally still have my doubts that it's the moon .... I have seen plenty of lens flare photos just like that

    Dave
     
  10. Feb 16, 2016 #9

    Drakkith

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    I'd guess that the light from the small sliver of sunlit moon is enough to make it look that bright. Just like the Sun drowns out everything in the image near it, the light from the small amount of visible sunlit side may be enough to drown out the nearby dark area. That's mostly a guess though.

    Wouldn't the moon look like that at all times then, not just during the day? I know the dark side of the moon isn't that bright at night, no matter what phase it's in.
     
  11. Feb 16, 2016 #10

    fresh_42

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    And I'm still not convinced that it can't be venus.

    But I highly recommend your warnings! Risking to burn your retina no photo in the world is worth it!
     
  12. Feb 16, 2016 #11

    davenn

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    That is a worthy thought :)


    D
     
  13. Feb 16, 2016 #12

    mfb

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    The clouds should be brighter than the moon, but they don't show that effect, they have a high contrast.
    Overexposure is also unlikely with those clouds.

    Lens flare roughly at the point where the moon is?

    What is the angular width of those images?
     
  14. Feb 16, 2016 #13

    Bandersnatch

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    Since earthshine is light reflected back from the lit side of the planet, you only get it bright enough to be noticeable when the moon is facing a fully lit day side.

    I actually do have the same doubts as davenn, but I'm also giving the OP the benefit of the doubt, and assume she knew what she saw with her naked eyes, so I don't want to dismiss it as just a lens flare.

    @Jessica Ann Yost: have you got actual time stamps on those pictures, including time of the day? Maybe they weren't taken in Maryland (your profile indicates this location)? We could then pinpoint more or less where the moon should be and see if its position matches the pictures.
    It couldn't have been made on 1st of May 2015, that's for certain - the Moon was then below the horizon on the opposite side of the sky (almost full Moon).
     
  15. Feb 16, 2016 #14

    davenn

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    awesome thought, at least I could put date, time and location into Stellarium and see where moon and sun were on that day

    EDIT .... OK just plugged a bunch of locations around the earth into Stellarium for that day, month, year
    and for ALL of them the moon was either in the opposite part of the sky or below the horizon

    so we really need real location, date and time. else it can only have been Venus or a lens flare


    Dave
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2016
  16. Feb 16, 2016 #15

    davenn

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    some lens flare examples
    The result is almost identical to the OP's image

    flare-76254.jpg depositphotos_6061373-Sun-lens-flare.jpg sunflare.jpg


    Your Honour

    I rest my case :wink:



    Dave
     
  17. Feb 16, 2016 #16

    russ_watters

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    Sorry, it is not. It is way too bright to be a new moon. More telling: the moon was nearly full on May 1, 2015 so it was on the other side of the earth at the time the photo was taken. :wink:
     
  18. Feb 16, 2016 #17

    russ_watters

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    It can't be Venus either: way, way, way too bright. You can't see Venus that close to the sun.

    It's a lens flare. A couple of observations:

    1. In all three pictures, if you draw a line between the sun and the flare, the line goes through the center of the photo.
    2. The first two photos are apparently taken within minutes or seconds of each other, yet the position of the sun and "moon" are completely different with respect to each other. They should be aligned and the same distance apart in both if that's what it was.
     
  19. Feb 16, 2016 #18

    davenn

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    thanks for the support :)


    D
     
  20. Feb 16, 2016 #19

    I don't think it's planet shine. Yes, I could tell it was the moon. It wasn't as bright to my eyes as it was to the lens of the camera, but looked like an almost full moon. I've never seen planet shine like that..
     
  21. Feb 16, 2016 #20
    I agree about the earth shine. I can't explain why the moon is glowing so brightly in such a position close to the sun's side of earth. The shadow should have been on our side of the moon. I've seen lens flare too. But I saw that moon before taking the pictures.
     
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