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Why sabotage when you could just no-show?

  1. Feb 6, 2008 #1

    ShawnD

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    Some places have laws where your employer needs to pay out a certain amount before they can fire you. The "2 weeks notice" is a myth; in reality people are fired immediately then paid for 2 weeks after that (so you don't sabotage stuff). If you quit your job, you don't get squat. This makes for an interesting situation when people want to jump jobs. While working, you apply for other jobs, then quit your old job once you are hired for the new job. If you're a real go-getter, you try to get fired from your old job once your new job is secure so you still get 2 weeks pay for a job you would be quitting anyway.
    Some of you might remember one episode of the Simpsons where Lisa starts ranting on TV rather than discussing some proposition, and the program director keeps her on the air and says "wait, I'm trying to get fired." Seinfeld had a similar situation where George ended up dragging some New York Yankees trophy behind his car while shouting through a megaphone in order to get fired.

    So here's the question: why not just call in sick like 20 days in a row? Won't the company still fire you for taking way too much time off work, and don't you still get the 2 weeks pay in that situation?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 6, 2008 #2
    At some point in your life, you will be asked by a potential employer whether you have ever been fired for cause. You will not like their response to your "Yes".
     
  4. Feb 6, 2008 #3

    chroot

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    You could be legitimately sick for 20 days, and your employer would be in deep legal doodoo if they fire you because of an illness. Many states have laws which limit the actions employers can take against employees who are ill, or say they are ill. They would probably just put you on short-term disability and begin demanding medical documentation.

    - Warren
     
  5. Feb 6, 2008 #4

    ShawnD

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    People who tell the truth during job interviews are called 'unemployed' around here.

    chroot you're probably right. Thanks for the input
     
  6. Feb 6, 2008 #5
    People who tell the truth during job interviews are called 'unemployed' around here.

    I know it's passe', but people will generally figure out whether you're honest. That's a coin you only get to spend once in your life; on't squander it on two weeks pay.
     
  7. Feb 6, 2008 #6
    lol oh yeah? tell that to the SUCCESSFUL politicians/lawyers/business men in general.
     
  8. Feb 6, 2008 #7
    If you define success in terms of money and power, you are correct. Think, though, of poor Simon Cameron. He was competent, gifted in several areas, did much to win the Civil War, yet will always be remembered as the man "who wouldn't steal a red hot stove".
     
  9. Feb 6, 2008 #8

    mgb_phys

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    My friend was trapped in a job where, to deal with the high rate of staff leaving after new management took over, they put everyone on a 3month notice period, and banned any time off during this 3month. So you couldn't resign and then start interviewing, you had to already have a new job lined up where they would wait 3months for you to start.
    It did lead to a lot of creative methods to get fired.
     
  10. Feb 6, 2008 #9

    ShawnD

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    Yikes. Having a 3 month notice period sets off a lot of alarms, and I would probably look for work elsewhere for that reason alone.
     
  11. Feb 6, 2008 #10
    I don't know where you live. In most (perhaps all) US states, employment is "at will" which means you may resign with no notice at all. Generally, most people offer two weeks and some employers will consider you ineligble for rehire if you do not (the equivalent of a bad reference). Employers can also, if they chose, accept your resignation immediately rather than have you around for two weeks.
     
  12. Feb 6, 2008 #11
    And you think it's because he wanted 2 weeks pay for free, and not because it was making fun of movies/shows where people let the crazy person (Like Lisa) talk in order to be heard, when in reality if someone let that happen they would get fired?
     
  13. Feb 6, 2008 #12

    lisab

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    You can't be serious...?!? In my lab, if we find someone has lied on a resume or in an interview, they will be shown to the door. Then they will be called "unemployed, due to being fired for cause."
     
  14. Feb 6, 2008 #13
    i would think a lot of employers would want to talk to the last people you worked for to check what kind of employee you were. you could just lie and say you were backpacking through europe the last 5 years but to some employers thats as bad as having a poor reference.

    if your comfertable lieing your pants off to get ahead while always having the chance of being cought and losing whatever it was you were lieing to get/maintain, then it might be worth it. for many people it is worth it. for most people it isnt worth the trouble and they find it easyer to put up with BS, doing good work anyway, and giving 2 weeks notice to get a positive reference instead of lieing to prevent having a negative reference.
     
  15. Feb 6, 2008 #14

    mheslep

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    - Hub
     
  16. Feb 6, 2008 #15

    BobG

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    Past employer references may be over rated nowadays.

    In an ethics class I once took, one of my classmates worked in an HR office. The only thing she was allowed to say about past employees to prospective employers was to verify the dates the employee worked there. Companies are afraid to get dragged into a lawsuit by trashing a past employee's performance even if they can back up their appraisal - it gains them nothing and is just a pain to have to fight about.

    Moments later, she was adamant about the dangers of lying on an application because one of her duties was to call an applicant's past employers to find out about the applicant's past performance.

    Somehow, she was the only one in the class that missed the irony.
     
  17. Feb 6, 2008 #16

    chroot

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    I'd venture that 90% of employers will say nothing except the dates of employment.

    - Warren
     
  18. Feb 6, 2008 #17

    ShawnD

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    I'll go as far as saying 99% of 'references' are actually just friends rather than the person's last boss. Can you imagine 1 scenario where you, as an employer, would give someone a positive reference?
    Case 1 - You fire them. You will not be their reference.
    Case 2 - They quit with 2 weeks notice, leaving your department short staffed, which makes you look bad when productivity slumps until the new guy is trained properly (could take months). You will not be their reference. At my last job, the boss was searching for a PhD chemist to replace the one who quit... 3 months ago. Do you think the old PhD chemist will get a good reference when his quitting basically killed the entire research department for 3 months, costing the company literally thousands of dollars? You might as well smash the GC with a baseball bat and do all the damage at one time instead; it's the same thing.

    Feel free to give 1 scenario where you can get a positive reference from your boss.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2008
  19. Feb 6, 2008 #18

    lisab

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    I quit a job to be a stay-home mom. When I went back into the workforce, that company wasn't hiring (in fact, they were laying off people). So I had to look elsewhere for a job. I used several references from that company; all gave glowing recommendations.

    I ended up working in an R&D lab. The job and I weren't a good fit (it was a very repetitive job in a department that was underfunded). I told my boss, he understood how I felt, and why. He was an ethical guy. I used him as a reference for my current job - and got a great recommendation.

    I have a great job now. Maybe I've just been lucky that my bosses have been good guys.
     
  20. Feb 6, 2008 #19

    ShawnD

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    That's basically it.

    I once quit a job at Wendy's and the manager stated that my quitting makes his turnover statistics look bad, and it would cost him a bonus worth several hundred dollars. He would not give a good reference because I personally cost him money.

    I also had jobs at 2 small drug companies. Both bosses (company owners) were very angry when I quit because they take it as some kind of personal insult that I don't want to work at that company anymore.

    All of my current references are coworkers I really liked.
     
  21. Feb 6, 2008 #20

    Evo

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    I don't know the laws in Canada, but in the US where it is common to have "employment at will", if an employee is fired, they get paid for nothing but actual days already worked. There is no severance pay for being fired.
     
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