Why Take Quantum and Statistical Mechanics Together?

In summary, in order to graduate with a physics major, students are required to take both Quantum mechanics and Statistical mechanics at the same time during their junior or senior year. Although these two topics are independent, they can be combined in quantum statistical mechanics. Feynman and Hibbs discuss a mathematical relationship between the two in their book "Quantum mechanics and path integrals", where the quantum mechanical propagator is related to the partition function of quantum statistical mechanics. This connection is not typically covered in a first course of statistical mechanics. A search for "quantum statistics" yields results such as Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics for fermions and bosons.
  • #1
SJay16
19
1
At my school, you have to take Quantum mechanics at the same time as Statistical mechanics (co-requisites) in either junior or Senior year as a physics major; why is this?
What is the relationship between the 2?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
They are independent topics, although they can be combined in quantum statistical mechanics. There is also a strange connection between them that Feynman and Hibbs discuss in their book "Quantum mechanics and path integrals": mathematically, the quantum mechanical propagator, which gives the probability amplitude for a particle to go from one point to another as a function of time, is related to the partition function of quantum statistical mechanics, where the inverse temperature ##\beta = \frac{1}{kT}## acts as a kind of imaginary time. That's kind of an advanced topic, and is not usual covered in the first course of statistical mechanics (if ever).
 
  • Like
Likes bhobba and SJay16
  • #3
Have you googled “quantum statistics”?

Examples: Fermi-Dirac statistics for fermions and Bose-Einstein statistics for bosons.

Zz.
 
  • Like
Likes bhobba

Related to Why Take Quantum and Statistical Mechanics Together?

1. What is the difference between quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics?

Quantum mechanics is a branch of physics that deals with the behavior of particles at the atomic and subatomic level. It explains the fundamental principles that govern the behavior of particles, such as wave-particle duality and uncertainty. On the other hand, statistical mechanics is a branch of physics that uses statistical methods to explain the behavior of large systems of particles, such as gases and liquids.

2. How does quantum mechanics explain the behavior of particles?

Quantum mechanics explains the behavior of particles through a set of mathematical equations, such as the Schrödinger equation, which describe the wave-like properties of particles. It also introduces the concept of probability, as the behavior of particles at the quantum level is inherently unpredictable.

3. What is the role of statistical mechanics in understanding thermodynamics?

Statistical mechanics plays a crucial role in understanding thermodynamics, as it provides a way to connect the microscopic behavior of individual particles to the macroscopic behavior of a system. By using statistical methods, we can calculate thermodynamic properties, such as temperature and entropy, from the behavior of a large number of particles.

4. Can quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics be applied to all systems?

Yes, quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics can be applied to all systems. Quantum mechanics can explain the behavior of particles at the atomic and subatomic level, while statistical mechanics can be used to describe the behavior of large systems of particles. Both theories have been successfully applied to various systems, from individual atoms to entire galaxies.

5. How does quantum mechanics challenge our classical understanding of physics?

Quantum mechanics challenges our classical understanding of physics in several ways. It introduces the concept of superposition, where particles can exist in multiple states at the same time. It also challenges our understanding of causality, as quantum particles can be entangled and can influence each other's behavior regardless of distance. Additionally, the uncertainty principle in quantum mechanics challenges our classical idea of determinism, as it states that we cannot know both the position and momentum of a particle simultaneously.

Similar threads

  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
1
Views
980
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
9
Views
3K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
16
Views
387
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
2
Views
962
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
9
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
1
Views
703
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
4
Views
1K
Back
Top