Work- constant pressure, changing volume

In summary, to find the work done by a gas when it is expanded from a volume of 1.0 L to 3.3 L at a constant pressure of 2.8 atm, you will need to convert the atm to Pascals and use the formula W=p(deltaV). However, to get the answer in joules, you must also convert the volume to cubic meters and the pressure to kilopascals. Once these conversions are made, the correct answer can be calculated.
  • #1
physics1234
21
0
Find the work done by a gas when it is expanded from a volume of 1.0 L to 3.3 L at a constant pressure of 2.8 atm.

I converted the atm to Pascals by multiplying 2.8 x 101325 to get 283710.

Then I used the formula W=p(deltaV)

so 283710 x (3.3-1.0) = 652533

I don't understand why this is the wrong answer.
 
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  • #2
Nevermind, I got it :-)

Thanks anyway!
 
  • #3
hi brother
so as to your answer be at joule
you must convert the volume to cubic meter m3 , and to convert the pressure to kpa not pascal , by multiplying by 101.3 , try the new answer...

sorry my english is not so good
 

Related to Work- constant pressure, changing volume

1. What is work in terms of constant pressure and changing volume?

Work is defined as the force applied over a distance. In the context of constant pressure and changing volume, work is the energy required to change the volume of a system while maintaining a constant pressure.

2. How is work calculated in this scenario?

The formula for calculating work in the context of constant pressure and changing volume is W = PΔV, where W is work, P is pressure, and ΔV is the change in volume.

3. Can work be negative in this situation?

Yes, work can be negative in this scenario. If the volume decreases and the pressure remains constant, the work done by the system is negative, indicating that energy is being released.

4. How does the first law of thermodynamics apply to work in this situation?

The first law of thermodynamics states that energy cannot be created or destroyed, only transferred or converted. In the context of constant pressure and changing volume, this means that the work done by the system must be equal to the change in energy of the system.

5. What are some real-world examples of work at constant pressure and changing volume?

Some examples of work at constant pressure and changing volume include a piston moving in a cylinder, a balloon being inflated, and a gas expanding in a sealed container.

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