Young'a double slit experiment

  • Thread starter kokok
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  • #1
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Homework Statement


in a double-slit experiment, blue light of wavelength 4.60*10^2 nm gives a second order maximum or CI at a certain location P on the screen. what wavelength of visible light would have a minimum or DI at P?


Homework Equations


x=(l*lamda)/separation


The Attempt at a Solution


I dun get it at all
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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The equation for double slit experiments when it is a maximum is
sin A=m(wavelength)/d. The equation for minimums is
sin A=(m+0.5)(wavelength)/d. Where A is the angle from where the observer will look at the spot on the screen. M is the "order" of the spots, whether it be max or min. d is the distance between the slits. Put all the constants on one side, which will be the sin A and d. Simple math and equating the equations together will get you the correct answer.

The question is a bit of vague, since it does not say what order is the minimum.
 
  • #3
10
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The equation for double slit experiments when it is a maximum is
sin A=m(wavelength)/d. The equation for minimums is
sin A=(m+0.5)(wavelength)/d. Where A is the angle from where the observer will look at the spot on the screen. M is the "order" of the spots, whether it be max or min. d is the distance between the slits. Put all the constants on one side, which will be the sin A and d. Simple math and equating the equations together will get you the correct answer.

The question is a bit of vague, since it does not say what order is the minimum.
i dunno it was nelson's text book chapter 9 review Qs
 
  • #4
Doc Al
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The question is a bit of vague, since it does not say what order is the minimum.
But it does say visible light.
 
  • #5
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lol, i missed that ;)
 
  • #6
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lol, i missed that ;)
um..how should i start it...
 
  • #7
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How should i start it!?><
 
  • #8
33
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well, just follow the instructions in my previous post

move the constants to one side for both equations and equate the other sides together.

m1(wavelength1)=(m2+0.5)(wavelength2)
you know that m1 is 2 and wavelength1 is 4.60*10^2 nm.
Now try different values for m2 that will result in a wavelength that's between 400 to 700 nm. (visible light)
 
  • #9
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oh, so when i replaced m2 to 1, i got about 600nm..i think thatz the answer.
 

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