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Pepealej
#1
Feb25-13, 12:22 PM
P: 20
Hi! I have a question regarding the Faraday cage.

I know how a Faraday cage works and understand the principles that make it work and why (potential difference, flux, gauss' theorem...) but I have a question.

Why some Faraday cages work eventhough they have holes in their surface. For example, I have seen things similar to wire fences used as faraday cages (in experiments with Tesla coils), and they work.

Why? Does this mean that the conductor can have holes in it's surface and still the electric field inside it is still zero?

Thanks! :)
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