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Is an engineering degree really that useful?

by fibo
Tags: degree, engineering
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Evo
#19
Feb15-13, 04:42 PM
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No fibo, I worked with the scientists that were developing new internet technologies, I was on the marketing end.

You sound young and inexperienced. You don't understand how things work in the real world, so you think what you were taught in college has no value and you couldn't be more wrong. Sounds like engineering is not for you, and that's fine, but don't come here spouting off about how things worked over 100 years ago. And I find it funny that you don't know that Joseph Swan invented the incandescent lightbulb.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Swan
berkeman
#20
Feb15-13, 04:42 PM
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Quote Quote by fibo View Post
Ok so how much more improvement do we need in this field?
For the last 4 decades we have many PhDs graduating in communications theory, and we haven't seen a single revolutionary invention that would eclipse the telephone, like what telephone did to the telegraph.
We certainly need continuing improvement. The bandwidth is limited, but the demands for communication keep increasing.

What you are saying is pretty close to misinformation (which is not allowed at the PF). There have been a number of significant inventions (Internet, HDTV, Digital Over-the-Air TV, text messages/SMS, 3DTV, etc.)

Quote Quote by fibo View Post
Ok, so what new revolutionary breakthroughs has academia given us in the last decade--with all those new math formulas they keep publishing?

I used a cell phone in the early 90s getting the same quality of service as today (probably better).
Misinformation again. Cell quality is significantly better (coverage, hand-offs), and there are many more useful features like SMS, 3G/4G coverage, GPS integration, Still/Video Camera integration, SMS/Video links for 9-1-1 calls, and so on.

And yes, a lot of those advancements came out of academic research and research at private R&D labs (like the lab I work in now, and at Bell Labs where I worked pre-Lucent).

Please just take a deep breath and focus on what you are going to do next. It does sound appropriate for you to gain some new practical skills, to team up with your academic background. I've always recomended that engineering students build projects on their own, to start to get a more practical feel for what matters in real product design.
fibo
#21
Feb15-13, 04:47 PM
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Quote Quote by ZapperZ View Post
Oy! The OLD Bell Labs was run as if it was an Academic Institution, not as a business! Talk to any of the old Bell Labs guys, rather than reading it out of a book! There were no pressure in producing profit, and people had the ability to pursue even theoretical work! It was, for all practical purposes, a research institution very much similar to a university or national lab!

So this very place that you are exulting so much was run in the very same way that you were criticizing Academia for!

Zz.
I know it ran like Academia..... but it was the old Academia or the late 1800s/early 1900s--- where profs where doing research out of their own curiosity and not R&D funded by industry/gov, they had tenure, didn't had to worry about funding their labs, and they occasionally taught a class of 20 enthusiast students.

My complaints are about the lack of productivity in today's academia. Where it's a drive thru business that really thrives on cheap student loans. Students come in, graduates go out learning nothing useful for industry and neck-deep in student loans. The academia today where profs are not tenured so they can't focus on the needs of their students...and are struggling with the publish or perish policy. Academia today where emphasis is more on rote learning and not conceptual learning.

Do you understand my points?
ZapperZ
#22
Feb15-13, 04:52 PM
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Quote Quote by fibo View Post
I know it ran like Academia..... but it was the old Academia or the late 1800s/early 1900s--- where profs where doing research out of their own curiosity and not R&D funded by industry/gov, they had tenure, didn't had to worry about funding their labs, and they occasionally taught a class of 20 enthusiast students.

My complaints are about the lack of productivity in today's academia. Where it's a drive thru business that really thrives on cheap student loans. Students come in, graduates go out learning nothing useful for industry and neck-deep in student loans. The academia today where profs are not tenured so they can't focus on the needs of their students...and are struggling with the publish or perish policy. Academia today where emphasis is more on rote learning and not conceptual learning.

Do you understand my points?
This is silly. It is OK for you to cite antiquated technology to back your claim, but yet, you want to compare that to present-day way of running things! No wonder you have such a difficult time sorting out what you understand - you change the rules whenever it suits you!

And until the early 80's, Bell labs was run like any university research that I know of TODAY! It is the SAME philosophy.

You speak of all this as if you are an expert and went through it yourself. I put it to you that you have practically NO knowledge of how it was at Bell Labs, and you also do not have any clue on how research work are done in Academic institutions, because you never did any of it.

Now prove me wrong.

Zz.
berkeman
#23
Feb15-13, 04:59 PM
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Thread closed for Moderation...
berkeman
#24
Feb15-13, 05:21 PM
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Because of the quantity of misinformation in this thread, it will remain closed.


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