Register to reply

Koch Snowflake Proof by Induction.

by 96hicksy
Tags: induction, koch, proof, snowflake
Share this thread:
96hicksy
#1
Jul13-14, 08:06 AM
P: 11
Hi, I was wondering if there is a way to prove the area of the Koch Snowflake via induction?
At the moment I have the equations:
An+1=An+[itex]\frac{3√3}{16}[/itex]([itex]\frac{4}{9}[/itex])n
and
An=[itex]\frac{2√3}{5}[/itex]-[itex]\frac{3√3}{20}[/itex]([itex]\frac{4}{9}[/itex])n
These two don't seem to work together very well when trying to prove by induction. Can anyone offer any advice? This is not homework by the way :).
Phys.Org News Partner Mathematics news on Phys.org
Researcher figures out how sharks manage to act like math geniuses
Math journal puts Rauzy fractcal image on the cover
Heat distributions help researchers to understand curved space
Simon Bridge
#2
Jul13-14, 10:04 AM
Homework
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
Thanks
Simon Bridge's Avatar
P: 13,110
So you need to find some consistent relation for the area of a koch snowflake?
Using you knowledge of geometry (it's all triangles after all) and the Koch snowflake itself, you should be able to come up with your own.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Koch snowflake and planck length General Math 4
Koch Curves Calculus & Beyond Homework 1
Area of a snowflake Calculus 4
Problem involving simple fractals (Koch snowflake problem) Calculus & Beyond Homework 2
Koch curve Programming & Computer Science 1