Register to reply

Force experienced by a current-carrying conductor placed in a magnetic field

Share this thread:
richieec
#1
Apr8-12, 07:33 AM
P: 2
I'm a little bit confused about this...i know that when a current-carrying conductor is placed in a magnetic field, it experiences a force called Lorentz force, this is the formula:

F = Bil

but the thing i can't understand is whether this FORCE is perpendicular to the magnetic field or the magnetic field is perpendicular to the CURRENT?

by the right hand rule, i can see easily that the magnetic field is perpendicular to the force, but in some books and examples it says that the current must be perpendicular to the magnetic field for applies this formula.
Phys.Org News Partner Physics news on Phys.org
Refocusing research into high-temperature superconductors
Neutron tomography technique reveals phase fractions of crystalline materials in 3-dimensions
Tiny magnets, huge fields: Nanoscale ferromagnetic electrodes create chemical equivalent of solid-state spin valve
tiny-tim
#2
Apr8-12, 07:49 AM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
Thanks
tiny-tim's Avatar
P: 26,157
hi richieec! welcome to pf!
Quote Quote by richieec View Post
F = Bil

but the thing i can't understand is whether this FORCE is perpendicular to the magnetic field or the magnetic field is perpendicular to the CURRENT?

in some books and examples it says that the current must be perpendicular to the magnetic field for applies this formula.
for this formula, yes

the general formula is F = I l x B

so this formula, F = BIl, only works if the current direction (l) is perpendicular to the magnetic field


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Magnetic field and force due to it in pipe carrying current. Introductory Physics Homework 0
Magnetic field due to a current carrying conductor is___? Classical Physics 5
Magnetic Force In A Current Carrying Conductor? Introductory Physics Homework 0
Force on a Current Carrying Conductor Introductory Physics Homework 0
Ampere's swimming rule about magnetic field around a current carrying conductor Classical Physics 1