Recent content by XxBollWeevilx

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    Kinetic friction on incline/flat surface system

    It seems I can't post the picture because it's from a site that has to be logged into. Basically, to the left is an incline on which the block starts. The length of the incline is the s1 listed. Then at the bottom of the incline the path levels off and the length of the level part is s2. The...
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    Kinetic friction on incline/flat surface system

    I already posted the pic, maybe you can't see it for some reason. Here's a link: EDIT: nevermind
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    Kinetic friction on incline/flat surface system

    Homework Statement http://nplq1.phyast.pitt.edu/res/msu/physicslib/msuphysicslib/13_EnergyConservation/graphics/prob27a_MechEnWFriction.gif When mass M is at the position shown, it is sliding down the inclined part of a slide at a speed of 2.07 m/s. The mass stops a distance S2 = 1.9 m...
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    System of masses over a pulley

    Ah! I just got it right. I was using the wrong directiond for my sums. For the x sum on M1, I assumed right to be positive and for the y sum on Mw I assumed up to be positive. This doesn't work because I need to assume that the pulley only changes the direction, and therefore the downward...
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    System of masses over a pulley

    Numerically? 1.07 m, 0.802 m, and 2.14 m.
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    System of masses over a pulley

    Yes, I realize that the ension will be equal in both cases...that's what I was trying to account for but I'm not quite sure how to account for it. Like I said, I solved for T in the hanging mass and used that in for T in the first mass...wouldn't that be assuming they are equal?
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    System of masses over a pulley

    Homework Statement http://nplq1.phyast.pitt.edu/res/msu/physicslib/msuphysicslib/09_Force_and_Motion/graphics/prob69_2blkplly.gif Two blocks are arranged as shown. The pulley can be considered to be massless, and friction is negligible. M1 is four times more massive than M2. If the...
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    A particle leaves the origin (motion in 2 dimensions)

    Thanks...I ended up getting the correct answers. Here's what I did: I set the first derivative of the equation you gave (which is essentially the basic formula v=v_0+at to zero to find at which time the maximum x would occur. Then I found the x and y velocity using that same formula but...
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    A particle leaves the origin (motion in 2 dimensions)

    Thank you both, I will try and use your advice to try and solve the problem. I don't understand the integration though...what exactly would I integrate to get the velocity? Velocity is the derivative of position with respect to time, so would the velocity be the integral of acceleration with...
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    A particle leaves the origin (motion in 2 dimensions)

    Homework Statement A particle leaves the origin with an initial velocity v = 3.92i , in m/s. It experiences a constant acceleration a = -1.00i -0.80j , in m/s2. What is the velocity of the particle when it reaches its maximum x coordinate? i-component of velocity? j-component of the...
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    Electric Field and Charge Density

    Right, I get that now. The integral would be evaluated from +x to infinity. Could someone point me to a place, or perhaps explain to me briefly, how substituting an infinity into an expression would affect it? I know that if infinity is ever in the denominator then the expression would be 0. Are...
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    Electric Field and Charge Density

    The charge is along a line that goes to infinity though...how would that work?
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    Electric Field and Charge Density

    Thanks for the help. I'll try and do that to see how it works out.
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    Electric Field and Charge Density

    Any pointer would be greatly appreciated.
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