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Featured 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

  1. Oct 2, 2017 #1

    Ygggdrasil

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    This morning, the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm.

    https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/2017/press.html
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 2, 2017 #2

    Drakkith

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    Congrats to the team!

    Hmm... I need to keep a consistent sleep schedule.
     
  4. Oct 2, 2017 #3

    jim mcnamara

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    @Drakkith - I think you work the nightshift, which affects several of aspects of the circadian rhythm. Example: exposure to daylight, replaced by indoor lighting at night.
     
  5. Oct 2, 2017 #4

    Drakkith

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    I haven't worked night shift in more than 5 years. My problem is that I can't get myself into bed at a decent time and so my sleep schedule swings back and forth by upwards of 4-8 hours. I've had this issue pretty much my entire adult life, regardless of what shift I'm working.
     
  6. Oct 3, 2017 #5

    ISamson

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    Receiving the Nobel Prize is a very high achievement and difficult to get. The team must be congratulated.
    Congratulations!

    We have for long known that we and all the other animals have an inner clock, that regulates our sleep and behaviour, but we have not known why. Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young have identified a gene that controls this stimulus, thus successfully explaining this behaviour. This is an outstanding discovery, because it answers a long-thought-of question. Well done!
     
  7. Oct 3, 2017 #6

    DS2C

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    Great stuff. What an honor.
     
  8. Oct 3, 2017 #7

    ISamson

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    Must be heart-breaking to wake up in the morning by a phone call from the Nobel Committee to find out that you have just won the most honourable prize in science. Wow.
     
  9. Oct 4, 2017 #8

    Fra

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    This is a great example of how much we can learn also about behaviour of more complex systems due to the universality of molecular biology by studying of behaviour cells of alot simple systems. It is interesting when you find functional and behaviour traits that are sort of scale invariant with respect to complexity. Sometimes i think that the life of fruit flies and yeast cells are not too unlike for the rest of us, they are by no means trivial things. Perhaps the much unwanted fruit flies should be shown some more respect :)

    /Fredrik
     
  10. Oct 5, 2017 #9

    robphy

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  11. Oct 25, 2017 #10

    SciencewithDrJ

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    Thank you for sharing this, it's simply outstanding work. I tend to be a night owl myself, and have been so most of my adult life. I didn't take it seriously, but based on these discoveries it seems I should.

    Many things come to mind as I read this news release.The power of hydrogen bonds in protein-protein interaction, in protein-DNA interaction, and in the increasingly significant evidence of membrane nano-bio-machinery in regulation of several functions in cells.

    The second thing that comes to mind is the bewildering commonality of molecular biology across living entities that otherwise look entirely different on the outside.

    And thirdly, the invaluable gain for humanity from basic research, as many people (and governments) criticize scientists who do research in areas that lack obvious and immediate practical application, which of course reflects lack of vision, because learning about the natural world, regardless of how trivial discoveries may initially seem, almost always leads to unexpected major long term rewards.

    And that's why I love science.
     
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