2nd bachelors or a masters degree?

  • #1
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What degree would provide me more job offers and have more potential? A second bachelor's in electrical engineering (I have a bachelor's in pure mathematics) or a masters in applied physics (where I would have to take a few undergraduate physics classes in order to get me up to speed)?

Thanks!
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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According to your previous threads, I thought you were doing a Master's in Physics? Is the possible change for employment sake only? Have you asked about any of the Alumni of that Master's program if they have had success finding jobs?
 
  • #3
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According to your previous threads, I thought you were doing a Master's in Physics? Is the possible change for employment sake only? Have you asked about any of the Alumni of that Master's program if they have had success finding jobs?
I have been admitted into a terminal masters program in applied physics, but am just concerned that I won't be able to obtain a job that say an engineer would be able to obtain, even though I would have a masters degree. Am I making sense?
 
  • #4
It depends on what you want.

To be honest if you do not like Engineering don't do it. As an EE student myself, I know how much time EE requires and would not advice anyone to do it if they are not absolute sure they want it.

As a pure math student you would probably be bored out of your mind and annoyed with the way we engineers do math ( a lot of hand waving takes place ).

Secondly, you have to like programming enough to sit down writing programs all day on the weekends.

Basically, if you see that there are things in EE and would almost "kill" you to do then don't go into EE. Unless you like the challenge.
 
  • #5
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It depends on what you want.

To be honest if you do not like Engineering don't do it. As an EE student myself, I know how much time EE requires and would not advice anyone to do it if they are not absolute sure they want it.

As a pure math student you would probably be bored out of your mind and annoyed with the way we engineers do math ( a lot of hand waving takes place ).

Secondly, you have to like programming enough to sit down writing programs all day on the weekends.

Basically, if you see that there are things in EE and would almost "kill" you to do then don't go into EE. Unless you like the challenge.
I like some aspects of engineering, but since I am currently working in the accounting field, I think that engineering will be also just another job sitting in a cubicle for 8 hours a day. Id really like to do research in things like cosmology, string theory, etc, but feel that because they are so detached from the "real world" that I will not have any sort of job offers
 
  • #6
I like some aspects of engineering, but since I am currently working in the accounting field, I think that engineering will be also just another job sitting in a cubicle for 8 hours a day. Id really like to do research in things like cosmology, string theory, etc, but feel that because they are so detached from the "real world" that I will not have any sort of job offers
If you are worried about a job, which I am frankly not surprised about, then you have good reason to be worried.

There are some feilds in EE that can get theorectical but not anything close to string theory. However, some of the guys that go into EM and solid state devices can almost be considered physicist.

Look around a bit more and find out if anything really peaks your interest. If nothing does then you have to make a decision. Would you rather have a job doing something you don't like for the rest of your life or would you rather study something you love and risk possibly not been able to support yourself talk-less of a family.

As for me, I would chose the former rather than the later but it is really a personal decision.
 
  • #7
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If you are worried about a job, which I am frankly not surprised about, then you have good reason to be worried.

There are some feilds in EE that can get theorectical but not anything close to string theory. However, some of the guys that go into EM and solid state devices can almost be considered physicist.

Look around a bit more and find out if anything really peaks your interest. If nothing does then you have to make a decision. Would you rather have a job doing something you don't like for the rest of your life or would you rather study something you love and risk possibly not been able to support yourself talk-less of a family.

As for me, I would chose the former rather than the later but it is really a personal decision.
I agree with you, but in my case, I have a wife and a 2 yr old daughter (expecting another in June) and I am 29 yrs old. I actually make pretty good money now (about $60k/yr) where I am at (in the public finance sector). It is a pretty boring job though and not challenging at all. I have always loved science, but feel like in order to make any money in science now, I would have to become an engineer because I basically make now what a professor would make to start off if I got into academics!
 
  • #8
I agree with you, but in my case, I have a wife and a 2 yr old daughter (expecting another in June) and I am 29 yrs old. I actually make pretty good money now (about $60k/yr) where I am at (in the public finance sector). It is a pretty boring job though and not challenging at all. I have always loved science, but feel like in order to make any money in science now, I would have to become an engineer because I basically make now what a professor would make to start off if I got into academics!
Do you realise that you would not be making more an 60K as an entry level engineer?

Another option is too get an masters in some engineering feild an then look for work.

Have you considered this ?

Going through another bachelors will put you under stress and would probably put you under some financial pressure for another 3-4 years.
 
  • #9
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Do you realise that you would not be making more an 60K as an entry level engineer?

Another option is too get an masters in some engineering feild an then look for work.

Have you considered this ?

Going through another bachelors will put you under stress and would probably put you under some financial pressure for another 3-4 years.
Don't I have to have a bachelors in engineering in order to get admitted into a masters in engineering program?

Your first comment is where my dilemma is. I have even considered getting my mba, continue to move up with it in the field I am currently in, and simply do physics for fun on my own time. But then I think to myself, wouldn't it be cool to get paid to study/talk about the universe!!!
 
  • #10
Don't I have to have a bachelors in engineering in order to get admitted into a masters in engineering program?
I believe it is possible. You should look into it.

Your first comment is where my dilemma is. I have even considered getting my mba, continue to move up with it in the field I am currently in, and simply do physics for fun on my own time. But then I think to myself, wouldn't it be cool to get paid to study/talk about the universe!!!
This is were being completly frank with yourself comes into play. You have a family and taking care of that family is undoubtely on the top of your list.

Certainly, pursuing a carrer in physics would probably bring you some measure of satisfaction, however, you have to consider the pros and cons.

I am no life advicer but I think you should sit down and think carefully about the benefits and possible disadvantages.

If I told you to pursue theorectical physics I won't be there to help you through any future financial difficulties. Neither would I be there to console you when you regret not pursuing a career in physics.

If you thing that taking a certain course of action would benefit you then by all means do so! However, if the opposite it true then you should seriously consider your priorities.
 
  • #11
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I believe it is possible. You should look into it.



This is were being completly frank with yourself comes into play. You have a family and taking care of that family is undoubtely on the top of your list.

Certainly, pursuing a carrer in physics would probably bring you some measure of satisfaction, however, you have to consider the pros and cons.

I am no life advicer but I think you should sit down and think carefully about the benefits and possible disadvantages.

If I told you to pursue theorectical physics I won't be there to help you through any future financial difficulties. Neither would I be there to console you when you regret not pursuing a career in physics.

If you thing that taking a certain course of action would benefit you then by all means do so! However, if the opposite it true then you should seriously consider your priorities.
I guess your right. I really do have to sit down and have a straight talk with myself to see what I really want. Thanks for the advice and good luck in your own studies!
 
  • #12
Thanks mate! And good luck ! :-)
 

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