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3 masses on an incline (connected)

  1. May 20, 2016 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Consider the three connected objects shown in Figure P5.88. Assume first that the inclined plane is friction- less and that the system is in equilibrium. In terms of m, g, and u, find (a) the mass M and (b) the tensions T1 and T2. Now assume that the value of M is double the value found in part (a). Find (c) the acceleration of each object and (d) the tensions T1 and T2. Next, assume that the coefficient of static friction between m and 2m and the inclined plane is ms and that the system is in equilib- rium. Find (e) the maximum value of M and (f) the minimum value of M. (g) Compare the values of T2 when M has its minimum and ma

    2. Relevant equations
    F=ma
    Efy=0
    Efx=0

    3. The attempt at a solution
    (a) 3msin@
    ( b) T1= 2mgsin@
    T2= 3mgsin@
    (c) a= 3gsin@
    ( d) T2= 6mgsin@
    T1 = 2mgsin@
    (e) 3ms + 2mgsin@/g
    (f) dont know what to do but fs less than Us.N

    The problem is long and confusing need help
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 20, 2016 #2
    Solution is too long that is why I only provided the answers I got. Are the answers right or did I make a mistake
     
  4. May 20, 2016 #3

    haruspex

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    It will be extremely hard to check your work with neither the diagram nor a description of the arrangement.
     
  5. May 20, 2016 #4

    haruspex

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    It will be extremely hard to check your work with neither the diagram nor a description of the arrangement.
     
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