6 months after dropping out of college - my tips

In summary: Be realistic about your chances of finding a job in your field after you leave school.3. Make a plan for what you will do if you are not able to find a job in your field.4. Make sure you have a backup plan for what you will do if you are not able to find a job in your field.
  • #36
Regardless, if there exist incompetent high ranking people or not isn't the point. The issue I was addressing is that when accessing advice given by a person, it would be beneficial to determine how much weight you should give to their experience. With regards to military, yes I am keenly aware that morons and incompetent fools have been promoted, but with that said, obviously the person knows how to get promoted despite being an incompetent fool, so when that fool says score a 300 on your PT test and go to this school, and work for this commander, it probably wouldn't hurt to listen. Likewise, if a competent corporal and telling you how to become a Sergeant, but hasn't been promoted nor has obtain P status within 4 years, you should probably be cautious to the advice. Lastly, if the new guy on the block is telling you all about his successful military career, then you might want to take a step back and examine whatever advice he wants to give.

All in all, my only point I wanted to make was that this kid rev is still a novice, and I give him credit for his ambition and drive towards success and do not wish to take that away from him. Nevertheless, I think it is important fact that someone should point out that he is a novice and that novice make plenty of mistakes and are not necessarily in a position to advise anyone beyond themselves.
 
Last edited:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #37
MarneMath said:
I don't want to inflame anything here, but my only concern regardless of the truth value of your endeavor is your ability to give practical advice. Right now, I very much consider you a beginner in this world and lack much of the experience and foresight to advise or assist others who may be in a similar position. While you have probably learned a lot, I have often found that in life, things that seemed like a good way of doing stuff often seem less clever in hindsight.

In every career I have ever had, my method and insight after a year on the job resembles very little my method and insight a few years down the road. It's the nature of growth. When I was a private in the Army, I thought I knew a good deal about the Army after a year, but then I became a Sergeant and I laughed at how stupid I really was, and then I became a Staff Sergeant and laughed at how stupid I was at a Sergeant. Clearly, as a Staff Sergeant, I had the ability to advise people on how to obtain my rank and do well in the Army, I had years of experience. Yet, I was always weary of other Staff Sergeants give me advice on how to obtain Sergeant First Class. I tend to take advice only from those who have made it to where I want to go, not those on the same path as me, or just beginning. Therefore, it would behoove anyone to read this thread lightly.

Good post, I absolutely agree with you on this. I'm sharing my experiences not as a self-professed expert, but rather from the perspective of an equal.
 
  • #38
Thread closed temporarily for Moderation due to Gauss M.D.'s posts...
 

Similar threads

  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
21
Views
920
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
18
Views
3K
Replies
10
Views
739
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
11
Views
3K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
33
Views
2K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
23
Views
3K
Back
Top