A doubt on the fundamental unit of charge

  • #1
"a charge smaller than e has not been found.
if one determines the amount of charge on any charged body like a
charged sphere or charged drop) or any charged particle
(like positron, a-particle)
or any ion, then its charge is always found to be an integral multiple of e,
i.e., e,3e; 4e,...
No Charge will be fractional multiple of e like 0.7e or 2.5e."

the book(notes actually) also gave this side note-
"The existence of charged particles called,quarks
whose electric charges come in multiples of e/3,
would not alter the fact that charge is quantized-
it would merely reduce the size of the basic
unit from e to e/3"

my question is wouldn't that still imply then
that a charge smaller than e does exist since
charge of quarks comes in multiples of e/3.
it would make sense if you add something more
like an isolated quark doesn't exist
like they always come in triplets
or of that sort such that the sum of charges
always adds up to e anyways.am i getting
it right.do correct if wrong.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
scottdave
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Insights Author
1,801
754
"a charge smaller than e has not been found.
if one determines the amount of charge on any charged body like a
charged sphere or charged drop) or any charged particle
(like positron, a-particle)
or any ion, then its charge is always found to be an integral multiple of e,
i.e., e,3e; 4e,...
No Charge will be fractional multiple of e like 0.7e or 2.5e."

the book(notes actually) also gave this side note-
"The existence of charged particles called,quarks
whose electric charges come in multiples of e/3,
would not alter the fact that charge is quantized-
it would merely reduce the size of the basic
unit from e to e/3"

my question is wouldn't that still imply then that a charge smaller than e does exist since
charge of quarks comes in multiples of e/3.
it would make sense if you add something more like an isolated quark doesn't exist
like they always come in triplets or of that sort such that the sum of charges
always adds up to e anyways.am i getting it right.do correct if wrong.
I'm not sure which book it is. From what you stated, it appears the author of the book does not know what the charge on a quark is, but is stating that if quarks have a fractional charge, they will still be quantized.
Like you couldn't split a proton and get 1 over sqrt(2) as one of the "pieces".

For "regular" particles, we have only encountered integer multiples of e.
 
  • Like
Likes ohwilleke
  • #3
34,962
11,147
All elementary particles have an electric charge that is a multiple of e/3.
All particles (elementary or composite) that can exist freely have an electric charge that is a multiple of e, as quarks always come in combinations that add up to a multiple of e.
 
  • Like
  • Informative
Likes ohwilleke, vanhees71 and scottdave
  • #4
mathman
Science Advisor
7,877
453
Proton have 2 up quarks (charges at 2/3e) and one down quark (charge at -1/3e). Neutrons have one up and two down quarks. Mesons have various combinations, such as a quark plus anti-quark of the same kind.
 
  • Like
Likes ohwilleke

Related Threads on A doubt on the fundamental unit of charge

Replies
18
Views
2K
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
8
Views
9K
Replies
13
Views
11K
Replies
13
Views
2K
Replies
8
Views
7K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
2K
Replies
23
Views
2K
Replies
12
Views
4K
Top