A falling mass attached to a load/slowing acceleration of gravity.

In summary, the conversation discusses the relationship between a falling mass and a load, with the understanding that the power of the falling mass is mgh. The question is how to find the balance between the load and the falling mass in order to achieve the slowest possible acceleration. It is mentioned that a larger load requires more power and results in smaller acceleration, but if the mass does not accelerate at all, it would not power the load. The conversation ends with a reminder to check the units.
  • #1
qazwsxedc
11
0
If you attatch a falling mass to a load (electric motor, lightbulb, ect.), the mass accelerates more slowly than 9.8 m/s. I know the power of the falling mass is mgh. My question is how to get the mass to fall as slowly as possible, assuming a fixed mass (changing the power that the load is taking).

It seems to me as if the larger the load is, the more power it requires, the smaller the acceleration of the mass is. But if the mass never accelerated (taking it to an extreme), it wouldn't power the load would it? Where is the balance, the perfect load to make the mass move as slowly as possible?
 
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  • #2
qazwsxedc said:
I know the power of the falling mass is mgh.

Check your units.
 
  • #3


I would approach this question by first considering the fundamental principles of physics that govern the motion of objects. In this case, we are dealing with the force of gravity and how it affects the acceleration of a falling mass. The equation F=ma (force equals mass times acceleration) tells us that the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the force applied to it, and inversely proportional to its mass. This means that in order to decrease the acceleration of the falling mass, we can either decrease the force of gravity or increase the mass.

One way to decrease the force of gravity is by changing the location of the experiment. On Earth, the acceleration due to gravity is 9.8 m/s^2, but on other planets or in space, this value can be different. For example, on the Moon, the acceleration due to gravity is only 1.6 m/s^2, so a falling mass would accelerate more slowly there than on Earth.

Another way to decrease the acceleration of the falling mass is by increasing its mass. This can be achieved by adding more weight to the mass or using a denser material. However, as you mentioned, there needs to be a balance between the mass and the load in order for the system to function properly. If the mass is too heavy, it may not be able to move at all, and if it is too light, it may not have enough force to power the load.

In order to find the perfect balance, we can use mathematical equations and principles such as work, energy, and power to calculate the optimal mass and load combination. We can also conduct experiments to test different masses and loads and see how they affect the acceleration of the falling mass.

In conclusion, the key to making a mass fall as slowly as possible is to find the right balance between the mass and the load. By understanding and applying the principles of physics, we can determine the optimal combination and achieve the desired result.
 

1. How does the acceleration of gravity affect a falling mass attached to a load?

The acceleration of gravity, denoted as "g", affects the falling mass by constantly pulling it towards the Earth. As the mass falls, it gains speed due to the force of gravity.

2. What is the relationship between the acceleration of gravity and the weight of the load?

The acceleration of gravity and the weight of the load are directly proportional. This means that as the acceleration of gravity increases, the weight of the load also increases.

3. Can the acceleration of gravity be changed?

The acceleration of gravity is a constant value that depends on the mass and radius of the Earth. It cannot be changed by external factors.

4. How does the mass of the load affect its rate of fall?

The mass of the load has no effect on its rate of fall. In a vacuum, all objects will fall at the same rate regardless of their mass.

5. How does air resistance affect a falling mass attached to a load?

Air resistance, or drag, can slow down the acceleration of a falling mass by pushing against it in the opposite direction. This can result in a slower rate of fall compared to a mass falling in a vacuum.

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