A Fermion interacts with the Higgs field

In summary: The Higgs field doesn't convert particles, it gives them mass. What is it like to be a massless electron?In summary, Matt Strassler's blog post explains that the presence of the Higgs field causes the top-left and top-right quarks to convert back and forth at an incredibly fast rate of about 100 trillion trillion times a second. This is significantly faster than the rate at which a lighter electron would convert, which is about 3E20 times a second. Additionally, there is no direct relationship between the average momentum of fermions and their rest mass, as the Higgs field does not directly affect their momentum. The analogy of the Higgs field converting particles is not entirely accurate, as it primarily gives particles
  • #1
Spinnor
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In a blog post of Matt Strassler we are told about the top quark,

"when the Higgs field is not zero, its presence, and the fact that it has a direct interaction with the top-left and the top-right, forces the top-left to convert over to a top-right, and back again. How often does this happen? About a 100 trillion trillion (100,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000) times a second. "

From, https://profmattstrassler.com/artic...known-particles-if-the-higgs-field-were-zero/

Because an electron is roughly 300,000 lighter than the top quark will the electron convert from electron-right to electron-left roughly 300,000 times slower, only about 3E20 times a second?

Edit, should have read further, the answer to the above is yes, sorry.

If the fundamental fermions are massless and constantly scattering off the Higgs field is there a relationship between their average momentum and their rest mass?

A fermion scatters off the Higgs field into a new direction, are all directions equally likely?

Thanks!
 
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  • #2
Spinnor said:
If the fundamental fermions are massless and constantly scattering off the Higgs field is there a relationship between their average momentum and their rest mass?

Unless I misread the article, they aren't scattering off of the higgs field. They might scatter off of a higgs particle, but not the field itself. So the field has no effect on their momentum in the way that a collision might (though it might in other ways, such as by influencing their mass).
 
  • #3
Don't take analogies too literally. And I think even the analogy is poor here.
 

1. What is a fermion?

A fermion is a type of particle that follows Fermi-Dirac statistics and has half-integer spin. Examples of fermions include electrons, protons, and neutrons.

2. What is the Higgs field?

The Higgs field is a quantum field that is theorized to permeate all of space and give particles their mass. It is associated with the Higgs boson, which was discovered in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider.

3. How does a fermion interact with the Higgs field?

A fermion interacts with the Higgs field through the Higgs mechanism, which explains how particles acquire mass. The Higgs field gives fermions their mass by "slowing them down" as they move through it, similar to how a swimmer moving through water experiences resistance.

4. What role does the Higgs field play in the Standard Model of particle physics?

The Higgs field is a crucial part of the Standard Model, which is the most widely accepted theory for explaining the behavior of particles and their interactions. It helps explain the origin of particle masses and plays a role in the theory of electroweak symmetry breaking.

5. What are the implications of a fermion interacting with the Higgs field?

The interaction between fermions and the Higgs field is essential for understanding the fundamental properties of matter and the universe as a whole. It helps explain why particles have mass and how they acquire it, providing insight into the nature of the physical world.

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