About Deja Vu: Mass and travelling into an alternate universe.

In summary, the conversation revolves around a movie review of a science fiction film featuring Denzel Washington. The main topic of discussion is the concept of time travel and how it is portrayed in the movie. The characters in the movie use a wormhole to transfer an object into an alternate universe called the 'Past'. The conversation also touches on the idea that too much mass or energy going into the wormhole could cause it to collapse. There is also mention of an electromagnetic field and how it is destroyed in the movie. The conversation concludes with a suggestion to not look for logic in the science of a science fiction movie and instead refer to reliable sources such as Wikipedia.
  • #1
Chaste
63
0
Hi all, not sure if any of you all have watched it. Denzel washington acted in it.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0453467/"

I have a question regarding what they said, they need to keep the mass low if they want to transfer an object into the alternate universe, which in the movie it's called the 'Past'.
I don't understand how mass is related to time travel.

Basically, they sent an object into the alternate universe via a wormhole.
 
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  • #2
Hi Chaste! :smile:

Obviously, this is complete rubbish, but I think the idea behind it is that wormholes would be unstable, and too much energy (which includes mass) going into it would cause it to collapse. :wink:

(and technically what they did isn't time-travel, it's just travel to a different place in a very similar universe)
 
  • #3
tiny-tim said:
Hi Chaste! :smile:

Obviously, this is complete rubbish, but I think the idea behind it is that wormholes would be unstable, and too much energy (which includes mass) going into it would cause it to collapse. :wink:

(and technically what they did isn't time-travel, it's just travel to a different place in a very similar universe)

hey tim! thanks for your reply! ya, somehow they traveled to a different world with a completely same worldline just that it is 4 and 1/2 days ago.
But can you tell me what's the logic(explanation) behind too much energy(mass, E=mc^2) destroying the wormhole?

and do you remember the part where Denzel Washington points a laser pointer at the monitors and they said the EM field is destroyed?
Why is there an em field?
 
  • #4
Is there a reason why this is such a curiosity for you? I mean, these movie-makers could simply make up some non-existent physics principles. They have been known to do that!

Zz.
 
  • #5
Why are you looking for logic in a science-fiction movie's science? :smile:
 
  • #6
jtbell said:
Why are you looking for logic in a science-fiction movie's science? :smile:

oh. I forgot to mention I'm doing a presentation on a movie review. uhm, I'm just trying to pre-empt some questions from my audience
 

Related to About Deja Vu: Mass and travelling into an alternate universe.

1. What is the cause of deja vu?

The exact cause of deja vu is still unknown, but it is believed to be a glitch in our memory system. It occurs when our brain mistakenly processes a current experience as a past one, creating a feeling of familiarity.

2. Can deja vu be explained by science?

Yes, scientists have been studying deja vu for many years and have developed theories to explain it. These include memory processing errors, dual processing theory, and neurobiological explanations.

3. Is it possible to travel into an alternate universe through deja vu?

No, deja vu is a psychological phenomenon and does not involve actual physical travel. It is a feeling of familiarity with a current situation that may seem like it has happened before, but in reality, it has not.

4. Is there a connection between deja vu and dreams?

There is no scientific evidence to support a direct connection between deja vu and dreams. However, some theories suggest that similar brain mechanisms may be involved in both experiences.

5. Can deja vu be prevented or controlled?

There is currently no known way to prevent or control deja vu. However, some studies have shown that stress, fatigue, and certain medications may increase the frequency of experiencing deja vu.

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