Accelerating a mass at very high acceleration @very low time

  • Thread starter emam
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  • #1
emam
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Dear all,
I would like to know if someone has experience with projectile accelerator (or mass accelerators).
I am working in space research field and here is my question:
I would like to know if we can find a system or a machine permitting to apply very high acceleration (like 10'000 g) at very low time (like 20-30 ms) to an object?

Usually with a centrifuge we can achieve this kind of acceleration, but in very longer time).
However, does someone know a way to have a device to give at least a shock of 10000 g at few ms?
Many thanks
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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10'000 g at 25 ms gives 2500 m/s over ~30 m distance. Those numbers are close to the HARP project and not so far away from the railgun designs that are tested.
 
  • #3
jerromyjon
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How much shock does a proton at LHC get?
 
  • #4
36,169
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Define "shock" (in a way that makes sense for relativistic particles).

And I think it would be better to start a separate thread for accelerations in particle accelerators, as they are orders of magnitude higher.
 
  • #5
jerromyjon
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How many g forces does a proton experience in max acceleration at LHC, it is relevant to the OP in the sense of a "technological limit". He specifically asked for someone with this experience.
 
  • #6
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It is a technological limit for particles close to the speed of light with one elementary charge per proton mass, something impossible to achieve for anything larger than a proton.
As seen in the frame of earth, they have a curvature radius of about 3km and a speed extremely close to the speed of light, that gives an acceleration of about 3*1013 m/s2 (about 3 trillion g). Smaller accelerators achieve larger values as the speed is very similar but the curvature radius is smaller.
 
  • #7
Nugatory
Mentor
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How many g forces does a proton experience in max acceleration at LHC, it is relevant to the OP in the sense of a "technological limit". He specifically asked for someone with this experience.
It's not especially relevant as a technological limit, because the technologies used to accelerate protons along a circular path in the LHC are not applicable to accelerating macroscopic objects in a straight line. The answer in #2 is more to the point.

However, because I'm a sucker for off the wall questions I grabbed a metaphorical envelope and calculated the average radial acceleration of a particle in the LHC ring to be something around ##10^{12} g##.
 

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