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Accelerating a mass at very high acceleration @very low time

  1. Dec 8, 2014 #1
    Dear all,
    I would like to know if someone has experience with projectile accelerator (or mass accelerators).
    I am working in space research field and here is my question:
    I would like to know if we can find a system or a machine permitting to apply very high acceleration (like 10'000 g) at very low time (like 20-30 ms) to an object?

    Usually with a centrifuge we can acheive this kind of acceleration, but in very longer time).
    However, does someone know a way to have a device to give at least a shock of 10000 g at few ms?
    Many thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 8, 2014 #2

    mfb

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    10'000 g at 25 ms gives 2500 m/s over ~30 m distance. Those numbers are close to the HARP project and not so far away from the railgun designs that are tested.
     
  4. Dec 8, 2014 #3
    How much shock does a proton at LHC get?
     
  5. Dec 9, 2014 #4

    mfb

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    Define "shock" (in a way that makes sense for relativistic particles).

    And I think it would be better to start a separate thread for accelerations in particle accelerators, as they are orders of magnitude higher.
     
  6. Dec 9, 2014 #5
    How many g forces does a proton experience in max acceleration at LHC, it is relevant to the OP in the sense of a "technological limit". He specifically asked for someone with this experience.
     
  7. Dec 9, 2014 #6

    mfb

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    It is a technological limit for particles close to the speed of light with one elementary charge per proton mass, something impossible to achieve for anything larger than a proton.
    As seen in the frame of earth, they have a curvature radius of about 3km and a speed extremely close to the speed of light, that gives an acceleration of about 3*1013 m/s2 (about 3 trillion g). Smaller accelerators achieve larger values as the speed is very similar but the curvature radius is smaller.
     
  8. Dec 9, 2014 #7

    Nugatory

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    It's not especially relevant as a technological limit, because the technologies used to accelerate protons along a circular path in the LHC are not applicable to accelerating macroscopic objects in a straight line. The answer in #2 is more to the point.

    However, because I'm a sucker for off the wall questions I grabbed a metaphorical envelope and calculated the average radial acceleration of a particle in the LHC ring to be something around ##10^{12} g##.
     
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