Acceleration - a constant or increasing?

In summary, Object A is accelerating in a vacuum with no external forces acting on it. When the accelerating force is removed and no friction is present, the object will continue to move at a constant velocity in a straight line, according to Newton's first law. The concept of quantum entanglement and its relation to the speed of light is not within the scope of this discussion.
  • #1
dano thompson
4
0

Homework Statement


Object A is accelerating thru a vacuum; no forces (gravity, nada) acting on the object but the force accelerating it. The force accelerating the object is removed and no friction is involved.


Homework Equations


Will the object continue to accelerate at an ever-increasing speed or will speed remain constant once force is removed?


The Attempt at a Solution

 
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  • #2
What does Newton's first law state?
 
  • #3
It's been a long time since I've been in school okay? I'm guessing law states: ... in motion stays in motion?
 
  • #4
F=ma. No force = no acceleration. Velocity remains constant from then on.
 
  • #5
dano thompson said:
It's been a long time since I've been in school okay? I'm guessing law states: ... in motion stays in motion?

Well yes but another way is that

A body at rest stays at rest, or if moving, continues to move in a straight line with uniform velocity provided that the resultant force on the body is zero.

So if you take away the accelerating force (or resultant force), then the ship should?
 
  • #6
Yea, I knew that, just wish it wasn't true sometimes. F=ma, baby.

So, does quantum entanglement exceed the speed of light?
 
  • #7
dano thompson said:
Yea, I knew that, just wish it wasn't true sometimes. F=ma, baby.

So, does quantum entanglement exceed the speed of light?

Hm. Not too sure. Best to ask in the Quantum Physics section, I am not too well versed in the details of entanglement.
 
  • #8
Thanks for the help fella's.
 

Related to Acceleration - a constant or increasing?

1. Is acceleration a constant or is it increasing?

Acceleration can be either a constant or increasing, depending on the situation. In some cases, an object may experience a constant acceleration, meaning that its velocity is changing at a steady rate. However, in other cases, an object may experience an increasing acceleration, meaning that its velocity is changing at an increasing rate.

2. What factors can affect the acceleration of an object?

The acceleration of an object can be affected by a variety of factors, including the object's mass, the force acting on the object, and the object's initial velocity. These factors can either increase or decrease the object's acceleration.

3. How is acceleration calculated?

Acceleration is calculated by dividing the change in an object's velocity by the time it takes for that change to occur. The formula for acceleration is: a = (vf - vi) / t, where a is acceleration, vf is the final velocity, vi is the initial velocity, and t is the time interval.

4. Can an object have a negative acceleration?

Yes, an object can have a negative acceleration. This means that its velocity is decreasing over time. This can occur when a force is acting in the opposite direction of an object's motion.

5. How does acceleration relate to Newton's laws of motion?

Acceleration is directly related to Newton's second law of motion, which states that the force acting on an object is equal to the object's mass multiplied by its acceleration. This means that if the force acting on an object changes, its acceleration will also change in response.

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