1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Acceleration in 2 component directions

  1. Dec 31, 2013 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    Find acceleration of 100kg ship using a component solution.

    2. Relevant equations

    Fnet = ma

    3. The attempt at a solution
    break into x and y components? so that Fnet for x = 150cos20 + 300cos30 = 100a and so a = 4.01 in x direction.

    Fnet for y = 150sin20+ 300sin30 = 100a and so a = 2.01 in y direction.

    And the mg = buoyant force?

    Not sure if I'm doing this right..
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 31, 2013 #2
    You did the x direction correctly, but not the y direction. The second term should be -300 sin 30. There is no need to do the z direction, since the problem statement is implicitly not asking for that.

    Chet
     
  4. Dec 31, 2013 #3
    If i do -300 then I get a negative force in the y component.... does that mean the boat is moving in the south direction (south east direction?)
     
  5. Dec 31, 2013 #4
    No. It means it's accelerating in that direction.
     
  6. Dec 31, 2013 #5
    oh yes a negative acceleration in the y component and a positive in the x component. does that mean it is going to get straigther and straighter in the x direction?
     
  7. Jan 1, 2014 #6
    What makes you think that?
     
  8. Jan 1, 2014 #7
    because the acceleration is decreasing in the y component. Doesn't that mean velocity is going to become 0 in the y component? And since it's + in the x component, then it will be eventually only have velocity in the x component?
     
  9. Jan 1, 2014 #8
    No. It just means that the velocity in the y direction will become zero and then negative. As time progresses, it will become even more negative.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Acceleration in 2 component directions
Loading...