Aerodynamics problem -- Hockey stick hitting another player

In summary: It is possible that the impact happened somewhere other than the skull, but it is more likely that the impact happened on the skull. Even if the impact happened elsewhere, it is still more likely that it happened on the skull than anywhere else.
  • #1
Dillypuff
1
0
Homework Statement
Hello all, this is not really homework but it's a problem I've been trying to solve. Let's say, in a hockey game, a player has a club with a mass of 100g. While running, instead of hitting the disc he hits another player, running in the opposite direction of the motion of the club. With what force does the club hit the other player? Average acceleration of the club is unknown, otherwise I'd simply apply the formula f =m*a. Im grateful for any help!
Relevant Equations
F =m*a
I thought it would make sense to use the formula f=m*a, but I do t know the acceleration and I don't know what is the average acceleration of a hockey club (guess it depends on strength of the player?).
 
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  • #2
Dillypuff said:
Homework Statement:: Hello all, this is not really homework but it's a problem I've been trying to solve. Let's say, in a hockey game, a player has a club with a mass of 100g. While running, instead of hitting the disc he hits another player, running in the opposite direction of the motion of the club. With what force does the club hit the other player? Average acceleration of the club is unknown, otherwise I'd simply apply the formula f =m*a. I am grateful for any help!
Relevant Equations:: F =m*a

I thought it would make sense to use the formula f=m*a, but I do t know the acceleration and I don't know what is the average acceleration of a hockey club (guess it depends on strength of the player?).
There is no way to answer on the given information. During the impact, the force rises from zero to some maximum then declines back to zero. Given the mass of the club and its change in velocity you can find its change in momentum, but without knowing how long the impact lasted, and how the force varied over that time, it is impossible to say anything about the force magnitude.

Aerodynamics??
 
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  • #3
haruspex said:
Aerodynamics??
More like Cruel Violent Athletics lol.
 
  • #4
A crude estimate which ignores the fact that the force changes over the duration of the impact is to compute the energy of the impacting club (##E=\frac{1}{2}mv^2##) and equate this to the work done by the club as it dents in the target skull (##W=\vec{F}\cdot \vec{d}##). If you know mass, impact velocity and depth of dent, you can come up with a number for "average" force.

[As @haruspex often points out, the relevant "average" is an average weighted by displacement. Normally when we talk about average force we mean an average weighted by time]
 
  • #5
jbriggs444 said:
##\dots## as it dents in the target skull ##\dots##
No helmet? Must be an MHL game.
Manly Hockey League.
 
  • #6
jbriggs444 said:
A crude estimate which ignores the fact that the force changes over the duration of the impact is to compute the energy of the impacting club (##E=\frac{1}{2}mv^2##) and equate this to the work done by the club as it dents in the target skull (##W=\vec{F}\cdot \vec{d}##). If you know mass, impact velocity and depth of dent, you can come up with a number for "average" force.

[As @haruspex often points out, the relevant "average" is an average weighted by displacement. Normally when we talk about average force we mean an average weighted by time]
Isn't it a bit pessimistic to assume that the point of impact was a skull? Isn't a skate blade or a foot more likely? And perhaps more to the point, isn't it not improbable that unless the other player positioned himself especially for the impact, the collision might stop (or otherwise interfere with the progress of) his foot while the rest of his body hurtled along (roughly) his current velocity vector and then curved downward, thus toppling him? As you and @haruspex seem to me to have ably pointed out: without some additional working assumptions, there isn't enough information in the problem statement to allow a reliable and accurate solution.
 

Related to Aerodynamics problem -- Hockey stick hitting another player

1. How does the aerodynamics of a hockey stick affect its impact on another player?

The aerodynamics of a hockey stick can greatly influence its impact on another player. The shape and design of the stick can affect the way it moves through the air and how it transfers energy upon contact with another player. A more streamlined and aerodynamic stick may have a more powerful and accurate hit, while a stick with more drag may have a weaker and less controlled hit.

2. What factors contribute to the aerodynamics of a hockey stick?

There are several factors that contribute to the aerodynamics of a hockey stick. These include the shape and design of the stick, the material it is made of, the weight and balance of the stick, and the angle at which it is held and swung. All of these factors can affect the way the stick moves through the air and how it impacts another player.

3. How does the angle of the hockey stick affect its aerodynamics?

The angle of the hockey stick can have a significant impact on its aerodynamics. A flatter angle can create more drag and resistance, resulting in a slower and less powerful hit. On the other hand, a more angled stick can reduce drag and increase speed, resulting in a more powerful and accurate hit.

4. Can the aerodynamics of a hockey stick be improved?

Yes, the aerodynamics of a hockey stick can be improved through design and material changes. Manufacturers are constantly researching and developing new stick designs and materials to improve their aerodynamics and overall performance. Players can also make adjustments to their stick, such as changing the angle or grip, to improve its aerodynamics for their personal playing style.

5. How do other factors, such as air temperature and humidity, affect the aerodynamics of a hockey stick?

Air temperature and humidity can have a minor impact on the aerodynamics of a hockey stick. In colder temperatures, the air is denser, which can increase drag and affect the stick's movement. Humidity can also affect the density of the air and potentially impact the stick's aerodynamics. However, these factors are not as significant as the design and shape of the stick itself.

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