Change in Momentum of a Hockey Puck

In summary, @The_Sadist is correct that you need either the force or the change in velocity to get a final answer. The best you can do with the information given would be to express the change in momentum in terms of either the force or the change in velocity.
  • #1
Wyatt Lowery
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0

Homework Statement


A hockey player hits a slap shot, exerting a constant force on a 3.06 kg puck for 0.06 seconds. What is the change in momentum of the puck?

Homework Equations



Impulse = Mass x (Change in velocity) = Force x time

(I think that’s all needed? Most likely missing one.)

The Attempt at a Solution


I’ve tried everything in my arsenal. I’ve communicated with my peers, and my teacher refuses to help because it is a part of the review for our final.

I’ve reduced the problem down to a series of relationships between acceleration, velocity, force, but still there are two unknowns in every equations and no way to solve from my perspective. I speculate that I’m either missing something in the problem or am at loss of an essential equation. All help is appreciated. (My teacher has been known to make faulty problems, it is a possibility that this cannot be solved.)
 
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  • #2
As far as I believe at least one Information is missing.

Force is the change of momentum in time. So you have the time and the mass of the puck, but the velocity or force is missing to determine anything further.

Maybe someone has a better solution.
 
  • #3
Wyatt Lowery said:
I think that’s all needed?

As far as I can see, it is.

Wyatt Lowery said:
My teacher has been known to make faulty problems, it is a possibility that this cannot be solved.

That would be my suspicion based on the problem description in your OP. As far as I can see, @The_Sadist is correct that you need either the force or the change in velocity to get a final answer. The best you can do with the information given would be to express the change in momentum in terms of either the force or the change in velocity.
 
  • Like
Likes Wyatt Lowery
  • #4
PeterDonis said:
As far as I can see, it is.
That would be my suspicion based on the problem description in your OP. As far as I can see, @The_Sadist is correct that you need either the force or the change in velocity to get a final answer. The best you can do with the information given would be to express the change in momentum in terms of either the force or the change in velocity.
Thank you. This has been killing me. I’ll express it as a proportion/relation.
 

Related to Change in Momentum of a Hockey Puck

What is change in momentum of a hockey puck?

Change in momentum of a hockey puck refers to the change in the puck's velocity over time. It is a measure of how much the puck's motion is changing.

What factors affect the change in momentum of a hockey puck?

The change in momentum of a hockey puck is affected by the mass of the puck, the force applied to the puck, and the duration of the force.

How is change in momentum related to force?

According to Newton's second law of motion, the change in momentum of an object is directly proportional to the net force applied to the object. This means that a greater force will result in a greater change in momentum.

How does the change in momentum of a hockey puck affect its motion?

The change in momentum of a hockey puck determines the direction and speed of its motion. The greater the change in momentum, the greater the change in the puck's velocity.

How is change in momentum conserved in a game of hockey?

In a game of hockey, the total change in momentum of all the players and the puck remains constant. This is known as the law of conservation of momentum and it explains why players can pass the puck to each other without changing the overall momentum of the game.

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