Finding Distance -- Hockey Puck Velocity

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In summary, the problem asks for the distance traveled by an ice hockey puck with an initial velocity of 45 m/s in 3.0 seconds. The equations used are d = vt and Δd = vΔt + ½aΔt², with a = 0 since no friction is mentioned. If friction is added, the equation becomes Δd = vΔt + ½(f/m)Δt², but since the puck is assumed to keep going at v, Δv = 0 and a = 0, resulting in the same equation d = vt.
  • #1
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Homework Statement


An ice hockey puck leaves a hockey stick with a velocity of 45 m/s, how far will it travel in 3.0 seconds?


Homework Equations


D = v/t or

## \Delta \vec d= \frac 1 2 \vec a \Delta t^2##

with ## \vec a = v_2 / \Delta t##

The Attempt at a Solution


[/B]
D = v/t
= 45 m/s / 3 = 135 meters

or ##0.5 (15 m/s^2) (3)^2## = 67.5 meters

Which one is it, and more importantly... how do I tell the difference on when to use each formula?

Thank you
 
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  • #3
Since no friction is mentioned, I believe for this problem you should assume there is no friction, which means the velocity is constant. In other words, a = 0.
 
  • #4
Thank you both very much. Very helpful.
 
  • #5
Actually a follow up question to this adds friction. The puck is hit with a force of 15.3 N and the friction slowing it down is 0.75 N.
Same time (3.0 s) same velocity (45 m/s)

So a = f/m then plug that into the second formula mentioned above?
 
  • #6
Catchingupquickly said:
##\Delta \vec d= \frac 1 2 \vec a \Delta t^2##
with ## a = v_2 / \Delta t##
Those equations are not quite right. It is ##\Delta d= v\Delta t+ \frac 1 2 a \Delta t^2## and ##a =\Delta v/\Delta t##.
You are not told the puck stops in 3 seconds. If you assume it keeps going at v then Δv=0 and a =0, so you end up with the same equation as d=vt.
 
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  • #7
Extremely helpful. Thank you
 

Related to Finding Distance -- Hockey Puck Velocity

1. What is the formula for finding distance using hockey puck velocity?

The formula for finding distance using hockey puck velocity is: distance = velocity x time.

2. How do you measure the velocity of a hockey puck?

The velocity of a hockey puck can be measured using a radar gun or a speed tracking device such as a smart puck. These devices use Doppler radar technology to determine the speed of the puck.

3. Can you calculate the distance traveled by a hockey puck without knowing its initial velocity?

No, the distance traveled by a hockey puck cannot be accurately calculated without knowing its initial velocity. The velocity of the puck is a crucial component in the distance formula.

4. How can the distance traveled by a hockey puck affect the game?

The distance traveled by a hockey puck can greatly affect the outcome of a game. A greater distance traveled means the puck is moving faster, which can result in more forceful shots and potentially more goals.

5. Is the distance traveled by a hockey puck affected by external factors?

Yes, the distance traveled by a hockey puck can be affected by external factors such as air resistance, temperature, and surface friction. These factors can alter the velocity of the puck and therefore impact the distance it travels.

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