Air drag and acceleration (not gravity)

In summary, in physics class, the students made and test fired a rocket. They were given the thrust and were able to find the maximum height and time of flight of the rocket. The mass of the rocket was 0.08 kg and the force of gravity was 0.8N. Now, they are trying to find the air drag acting on the rocket, but are unsure how to do so since the formulas typically require velocity, which is not given during the upward acceleration phase. The time it took for velocity to reach 0 and for the rocket to reach maximum height and fall back to the ground was 4.96 seconds.
  • #1
Unstoppable13
6
0
In physics class we made a rocket and test fired it. Now we are given the thrust and we found out the max height of the rocket and the time of flight.

Max Height = 76m
Time of thrust/ upward acceleration = .8s
Time of flight with only gravity acting until velocity is 0 . = 4.96s (not including downward fall)
Mass of rocket = 0.08 kg
Fg= 0.8N
g= 9.8m/s^2

Now we are supposed to find the air drag acting on the object. But I have no clue on how to do that because all the formulas relate to velocity, which is not really a given because the rocket is accelerating upwards. So is there a formula that I can use to solve this?
 
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  • #2
The rocket is not accelerating upwards during this phase:

Unstoppable13 said:
Time of flight with only gravity acting until velocity is 0 . = 4.96s (not including downward fall)
 
  • #3
DaveC426913 said:
The rocket is not accelerating upwards during this phase:

4.96 seconds is the time it took for velocity to be 0, ... reach maximum height
 

Related to Air drag and acceleration (not gravity)

1. What is air drag?

Air drag, also known as air resistance, is a force that opposes the motion of an object through the air. It is caused by the collision of air molecules with the surface of the object.

2. How does air drag affect acceleration?

Air drag acts in the opposite direction of an object's motion, so it can decrease the overall acceleration of the object. This is because some of the force that would have contributed to acceleration is instead used to overcome air resistance.

3. What factors affect the amount of air drag experienced by an object?

The amount of air drag experienced by an object depends on several factors, including the object's shape, size, and speed. Objects with larger surface areas and higher speeds generally experience more air drag.

4. Can air drag ever be beneficial?

Yes, in some cases air drag can be beneficial. For example, it can help slow down a vehicle or object and prevent it from crashing or causing damage. In sports such as skiing or cycling, air drag can also be used strategically to improve performance.

5. How is air drag calculated?

The calculation of air drag involves complex mathematical equations and requires knowledge of the object's shape and properties. It also depends on the density and viscosity of the air, which can vary. Therefore, it is often estimated through experiments and simulations rather than calculated precisely.

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