Air Inside Bus: Common Phenomenon Explained

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In summary,Some people believe that the air inside a bus is being sucked in from various sources, including the windows and the doors. However, this theory is not supported by evidence. The air inside a bus is usually sucked in from the front and pressure is evened out.
  • #1
Blizz91
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My doubt is reguarding the common phenomenon observed in the moving bus...While moving in a accelerating bus we all observe the wind gushing inside the bus may it be from the window of the driver or the passenger or even from the doors. My question is if all this air is entering inside the bus from where they are going out if the rear window is closed
and even roofs are packed
 
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  • #2
hi there blizz

as you have observed, the bus isn't exactly airtight. There may be a temporary increase in air pressure but I would doubt that it last long
There's likely to be as many gaps around doors etc letting air out as there are letting air in

cheers
Dave
 
  • #3
Hi davenn

If its the door u r talking about then won't u think if a person standing there would experience air entering the bus.
 
  • #4
Blizz91 said:
if all this air is entering inside the bus from where they are going out if the rear window is closed
Sometimes air is coming in and out thought different parts of the same opening: You feel air coming in from at back of the window, but at its front part a piece of paper gets sucked out of the car.
 
  • #5
Actually the apparent air movement would even happen in a completely air-tight bus. As the bus begins to move, the air molecules tend to lag due to their inertia. As a result, there is a net movement of air from the front to the back of the bus. This builds up a pressure gradient, that will eventually push the air inside the bus to catch up, and the pressure evens out. The air is sloshing back.

Here is a good demonstration :D.
 
  • #6
borisgred said:
Actually the apparent air movement would even happen in a completely air-tight bus. As the bus begins to move, the air molecules tend to lag due to their inertia. As a result, there is a net movement of air from the front to the back of the bus. This builds up a pressure gradient, that will eventually push the air inside the bus to catch up, and the pressure evens out. The air is sloshing back.

Here is a good demonstration :D.
I'm sorry, but that isn't the phenomena being described here. If the air temp is constant and absent a void such as created by the balloon, the "sloshing" is miniscule.
 
  • #7
A.T. said:
Sometimes air is coming in and out thought different parts of the same opening: You feel air coming in from at back of the window, but at its front part a piece of paper gets sucked out of the car.


Ok then, now consider a bus with a large window where a single window is shared by 2 consecutive seats( in a row) then if what u r saying is true then don't u think the passengers sitting they would experience opposite phenomenon but I personally hav experienced the opposite
 
  • #8
borisgred said:
Actually the apparent air movement would even happen in a completely air-tight bus. As the bus begins to move, the air molecules tend to lag due to their inertia. As a result, there is a net movement of air from the front to the back of the bus. This builds up a pressure gradient, that will eventually push the air inside the bus to catch up, and the pressure evens out. The air is sloshing back.

Here is a good demonstration :D.


hey Boris, I think u didnt get what i asked though there might be inertia of the air particle present there but as russ said I think that effect will be too minuscule and also this is due to bus accelerating, but the phenomenon which I described can be experienced even when bus is moving with constant velocity
 
  • #9
Blizz91 said:
I personally hav experienced the opposite
And I personally have experienced stuff being sucked out of the car window many times. Sometimes sucked out from the front window, and return back into the car though the back window. With a single opened window the same is possible, just within a smaller opening.
 

Related to Air Inside Bus: Common Phenomenon Explained

What is the reason behind the air inside a bus?

The air inside a bus is a result of the bus's ventilation system. The bus's ventilation system works by drawing air from outside the bus and recirculating it inside. This process is done to maintain a comfortable temperature and ensure good air quality inside the bus.

Why does the air feel colder inside the bus?

The air inside the bus may feel colder due to the air conditioning system. The air conditioning system works by cooling the air before it is circulated inside the bus. Also, the movement of the bus causes air to flow, making it feel colder.

Is the air inside the bus safe to breathe?

Yes, the air inside the bus is safe to breathe. The ventilation system of the bus filters out pollutants and ensures good air quality. However, it is always recommended to open the windows for fresh air circulation, especially in crowded buses.

Why does the air inside the bus feel stuffy?

The air inside the bus may feel stuffy due to the lack of fresh air circulation. This can happen when the bus is crowded and there is limited air flow from the windows. In such cases, it is recommended to open the windows for fresh air to enter the bus.

How can the air inside the bus be improved?

The air inside the bus can be improved by regularly maintaining the bus's ventilation system and ensuring that the filters are clean. Opening the windows for fresh air circulation can also help in improving the air quality inside the bus. Additionally, avoiding overcrowding in the bus can also help in improving air flow and quality.

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