Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

B Airplanes stay level at higher velocities?

  1. Sep 30, 2016 #1

    pug

    User Avatar

    Hi,

    I was wondering- how would a normal winged airplane (jet/propeller) stay level as it increased in speed? In other words, increasing the velocity over an airfoil will generate more lift. But what if a pilot just wants to go faster and not higher? Where does that increased upward force from induced drag over a wing because a pilot wants to go faster go? thanks!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 30, 2016 #2
    Modern aircraft both civil and military have adjustable wing configuration depending on the present situation.
    The most obvious examples being flaps on the rear of the wing and slats on their leading edge.
    This is good for take off and landing, but they get tucked back into the main wing structure for normal flight as they just create needless drag on the aircraft.
     
  4. Sep 30, 2016 #3

    davenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

  5. Sep 30, 2016 #4

    andrewkirk

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    They can push the yoke ('steering wheel') forward, which pushes down the elevator flaps on the tail, which in turn pushes the tail up, thereby pointing the plane's nose down a bit. That reduces the lift from the wings as well as directing some of the propulsion of the jets towards pushing the plane downwards.

    If they want to sustain this setting they can change the 'trim', which activates little extra flaps on the ends of the elevator flaps. 'Trim down' makes these little flaps go up, which makes the airflow push the elevators down (hence removing the need to use the yoke to do this), which in turn points the plane downwards.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted