An attempt to the Unified Theory of Physics.

In summary, the man claims that the photon is nothing more than a hypothetical particle that Planck misinterpreted from his experimental data. He found a constant and continual difference between wave units when he compared their temperature as a function of the wavelength. Hubble found the same wave displacement but interpreted it as the Doppler Effect.
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Hi!
I found a man that claims the following
The photon is nothing else that a hypothetical particle that Planck misinterpreted from his experimental data from his experiments with heat radiation within the optical wavelength spectra, where the temperature and wavelengths had been measured.

They could se a relation between temperature and wavelength. And he found after analysis of the data a constant and a continual difference between the wave units when he compared their temperature as a function of the wavelength.

What Planck saw that nobody else saw was that the wavelength increases constant and continual with the spreading.
In a try to understand this hidden difference Planck tried to relate the temperature to the wave units, but recalculated them the frequency units.
The relation between temperature and wavelength was already known by Wien's displacement law.

Planck had problems with understanding the explanation and his temporary interpretation became that between every frequency unit there was a energy quantum with the unit JS (joule second) that couldn’t be written correctly with the SI-system i.e. energy per time unit.

In this way the hypothesis that the energy difference between the frequency units is a quantified energy unit that isn’t deduced in a logical way or understandable.

Hubble found the same wave displacement but interpreted it as the Doppler Effect.
The galaxy-radiation’s wave displacement is 1 Ångström per 16 million light years which corresponds to the entropy displacement that Planck couldn’t understand (6,6 * 10^-34)

Read more at [crackpot url removed]

What is wrong and where does his theories fall?
 
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Mostly that is so confusing, that I wouldn't bother to find specific mistakes, but "the relative velocity of light" section at least is absolutely ridiculous to anyone who has understood the basics about special relativity.
 
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You know, there are quite a lot of people we call "crackpots" out there, and they are especially noisy on the internet. We clean out PF for this ; if you want to know what happens to a forum where this is not done, have a look at the usenet group sci.physics.

To recognize them, here is the world-famous crackpot index:

http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/crackpot.html

I'm going to lock this thread now, as we don't discuss crackpot cites (and after a visit, it is clear that the cite asked about by the OP is of this kind!).
 
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1. What is the Unified Theory of Physics?

The Unified Theory of Physics, also known as the Theory of Everything, is a hypothetical framework that aims to explain and connect all known physical phenomena in the universe. It seeks to unify the four fundamental forces of nature - gravity, electromagnetism, strong nuclear force, and weak nuclear force - into one single theory.

2. Why is the Unified Theory of Physics important?

The Unified Theory of Physics is important because it would provide a complete and consistent framework for understanding the fundamental laws of nature. It would also allow for a deeper understanding of the universe and potentially lead to new discoveries and advancements in technology.

3. Who came up with the idea of the Unified Theory of Physics?

The idea of a Unified Theory of Physics has been around since ancient times, but it was Albert Einstein who first proposed the concept in the 20th century. He spent much of his later life trying to develop a unified field theory that would explain all physical phenomena.

4. What are some challenges in developing the Unified Theory of Physics?

One of the main challenges in developing the Unified Theory of Physics is the sheer complexity of the universe. The four fundamental forces operate at vastly different scales, making it difficult to reconcile them into one theory. Additionally, the lack of experimental evidence for some of the forces, such as gravity, makes it challenging to develop a comprehensive theory.

5. Has the Unified Theory of Physics been proven?

No, the Unified Theory of Physics has not been proven yet. Scientists are still working on developing a unifying theory that can be tested and supported by experimental evidence. However, there have been several promising theories, such as string theory and loop quantum gravity, that aim to unify the fundamental forces and have gained much attention in the scientific community.

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