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Angular Frequency vs. Angular Velocity

  1. Dec 4, 2014 #1
    In S.H.M omega denotes?I am really confused where to put pi=3.14 and where to put pi=180 degrees.In one question while solving for omega when Time period is given from formula T=2pi/omega i took pi=3.14 and got right but in other question in similar situation i.e solving for omega when Time period is given from formula T=2pi/omega ,when i took pi=3.14 i got wrong when i saw solution i came to know that there has to be pi=180 degrees.I am really confused.where omega is radian per second and where it is only per second?And where to put pi=3.14 and where to put pi=180 degrees in formula T=2pi/omega?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 4, 2014 #2

    Drakkith

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    Staff: Mentor

    I would think that either the question itself, or your instructor, should be telling you whether to do the problem in radians or degrees.
     
  4. Dec 4, 2014 #3
    In one question while solving for omega whenTime period is given from formula T=2pi/omega i took pi=3.14 and got right but in other question in similar situation i.e solving for omega when Time period is given from formula T=2pi/omega ,when i took pi=3.14 i got wrong when i saw solution i came to know that there has to be pi=180 degrees.I am really confused.
     
  5. Dec 4, 2014 #4

    Drakkith

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    Staff: Mentor

    Repeating what you've already said without giving any more information isn't going to help anyone help you. What exactly do the questions say?
     
  6. Dec 4, 2014 #5

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    pi is never equal to 180 degrees; pi is a number. Angular frequency, ##\omega##, is usually given in radians/sec. In that case, the period is given by ##T = 2 \pi/\omega##. If angular frequency is given in degrees/sec, then you'd have to use ##T = 360/\omega##.

    Note that ##2\pi## is the number of radians in a complete cycle and 360 is the number of degrees in a complete cycle.
     
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