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Programs Any advice for choosing a major?

sce

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I am currently a freshman and I am feeling increasing pressure to choose a major. I do not really know what I want to do but I have done some research and have narrowed it down to physics, math, or engineering (all except chemistry focused ones). I have really enjoyed all my calculus classes and physics classes, but I am worried about getting a job in those with just a bachelors degree. Can anyone offer some advise? Thanks!
 
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As a general statement, there are usually more jobs in engineering than in pure science. I suggest therefore that you look at the many engineering options and choose one of those.
 
I'm in the same boat only I'm 21, lol but pretty much like dr.d said most of the options for careers are in engineering. It seems the overwhelming majority of college majors are deemed "useless" by many.
 
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I don't think anybody would call physics "useless," but it is a simple fact that there have always been more jobs for engineers than for physicists. It is also true that many physics majors wind up in engineering jobs, but is that the best way to get there? Some might say "yes," but I think not.

If I may speak personally for a moment, one of my first industrial jobs carried the title "Senior Staff Physicist," even though all of my degrees are in engineering. In that company, and in countless others as well, the title "Engineer" meant project engineer, the person who was responsible for a particular contract fulfillment. When they wanted someone who could handle higher math and advanced classical physics, that person was, by definition called a "Physicist." My predecessor in the position had been a Dutch physicist (he died in the job), but I was entirely able to step in and pick up the work and carry it to conclusion.

A BS in Engineering typically prepares a person to become a project engineer, which means some minimal amount of applied physics, and a whole lot of project management (facilities, scheduling, budgets, etc). If you want to do something more involved with the theoretical side, even if it is also experimental such as being a test engineer, then I strongly recommend getting an MS. This will mark you as a person with much more solid physics background.
 
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I am currently a freshman and I am feeling increasing pressure to choose a major. I do not really know what I want to do but I have done some research and have narrowed it down to physics, math, or engineering (all except chemistry focused ones). I have really enjoyed all my calculus classes and physics classes, but I am worried about getting a job in those with just a bachelors degree. Can anyone offer some advise? Thanks!
Have you considered statistics and computer science? Mathematics with computer science, statistics with computer science, mathematics with statistics are solid choices.
 

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