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Any good education journals, magazines, etc.?

  • Thread starter SamRoss
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SamRoss
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Main Question or Discussion Point

I had to suffer through a lot of pseudo-science to earn my master's in education. I am suffering through more of it now while I "study" for my administration license. In fact, because anachronistic theories such as VAK (visual, auditory, kinesthetic learners) get floated around so much in the education community, I have put off even searching for good research because I believed none existed. I'm still not sure, but I'd like to find out and I trust the PF community about a thousand times more than I trust the professors of the courses I'm taking. Can anyone recommend journals, magazines, books, websites, stone tablets, or anything else that are based on solid research?
 

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  • #2
berkeman
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Welcome to the PF. :smile:
In fact, because anachronistic theories such as VAK (visual, auditory, kinesthetic learners) get floated around so much in the education community
In my training experience (mostly in EMS and the Medical field), this is a valid concept. People learn best in different ways, which is why we use all of those modalities in our training.

Can anyone recommend journals, magazines, books, websites, stone tablets, or anything else that are based on solid research?
In general, if you do a search for articles on a subject, look for links that are to peer-reviewed literature and at very reputable websites like NCBI, AMA, etc. When reading Wikipedia articles, look at the reference list and click into links at peer-reviewed journals.

Here is what we have in the PF Rules for how to determine if a link posted in our technical forums qualifies:

Acceptable Sources:
Generally, discussion topics should be traceable to standard textbooks or to peer-reviewed scientific literature. Usually, we accept references from journals that are listed here:

http://ip-science.thomsonreuters.com/mjl/

Use the search feature to search for journals by words in their titles. If you have problems with the search feature, you can view the entire list here:

http://ip-science.thomsonreuters.com/cgi-bin/jrnlst/jlresults.cgi?PC=MASTER
 
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In my training experience (mostly in EMS and the Medical field), this is a valid concept. People learn best in different ways, which is why we use all of those modalities in our training.
If you mean that people learn best when presented with material in different ways that seems to be valid, but that such learning styles exist and have benefits is dubious.

Can anyone recommend journals, magazines, books, websites, stone tablets, or anything else that are based on solid research?
Research about what? Learning in general? Teaching in a particular subject area?
 
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SamRoss
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Welcome to the PF. :smile:
Much appreciated (although actually I've been here for quite some time).

In my training experience (mostly in EMS and the Medical field), this is a valid concept. People learn best in different ways, which is why we use all of those modalities in our training.
I won't get into it here, but I have a great deal to say on this topic. I'll probably start a thread on it in the near future.

In general, if you do a search for articles on a subject, look for links that are to peer-reviewed literature and at very reputable websites like NCBI, AMA, etc.
Those appear to be related to medicine, but I appreciate the response.
 
  • #5
SamRoss
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If you mean that people learn best when presented with material in different ways that seems to be valid, but that such learning styles exist and have benefits is dubious.
Agreed.

Research about what? Learning in general? Teaching in a particular subject area?
Learning in general is an interesting subject, but in my experience, discussions and articles on this topic tend not to be of much practical use. I am after the answers to very simple and specific questions. Some examples: Are students better able to answer percents word problems by drawing diagrams or by plugging into equations? Do students retain more information from a read-aloud or independent reading? Which blended learning models have shown the most success? Is there a point of diminishing returns when it comes to repetitious exercises and if so, what is it (for instance, if a student is still shaky after attempting two integration by parts problems, five more might help, but if the student is still shaky after twenty then it might be a good idea to switch gears)?
 
  • #6
berkeman
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I am after the answers to very simple and specific questions. Some examples:
You are in the right place now. By virtue of our rules and the PF members who are in touch with those rules, this is the right place for you to post your questions. You will rarely get pseudoscience oriented replies here, and those will be deleted within nanoseconds. :wink:
 
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The best professional development I've ever done was when a professor emeritus of neuroscience came to our small school to discuss with the faculty what is known about how the brain learns. It sounds like you need some good resources about educational neuroscience. Unfortunately I am not aware of any and my 3 minutes on google didn't turn up much for promising results. There are some (new) journals that have been started, but the field looks perhaps too new to have a single well-established journal. I would love to be corrected on this if someone knows of one/some!

Are students better able to answer percents word problems by drawing diagrams or by plugging into equations? Do students retain more information from a read-aloud or independent reading? Which blended learning models have shown the most success? Is there a point of diminishing returns when it comes to repetitious exercises and if so, what is it (for instance, if a student is still shaky after attempting two integration by parts problems, five more might help, but if the student is still shaky after twenty then it might be a good idea to switch gears)?
To answer your questions: yes.

There is no one approach to anything that will work better than any others. The more areas of the brain that you can engage in the learning process the stronger the learning will be. That is one of the major takeaways I've learned about learning. The large role that the amygdala plays in learning is interesting. The more that one's emotions are engaged in the learning process the stronger the learning outcomes.

Sorry I can't be of more help about a solid source of information!
 
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