Any suggestion for mrthods of studying electronics?

In summary: Thanks . I also bought some of capacitors,diodes,transformers,multimetre etc. But I don't know about arduino.just tinker. use a combination of pen-and-paper design, software circuit simulation, breadboarding/building, and maybe matlab/scilab. do both analog and digital, power and signal. spend a lot of time reading datasheets and app notes. stay away from high power/voltage.
  • #1
Hyperspace2
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I am first year engineering(electonics ) student. I have much passion in this subject. But I know the passion is not everything. Following right way is important. Whenever I lok my textbook, then enormous and complicated circuits dance infront of me. Anyway I tackle them by brain an understan them almost completely(I think). Only understanding won't be fine , I shoul be very creative and skilled to desighn circuits. But How do I get that skill . Will i have to break the electonic machine and then study that way. I don't know . I want to get suggestion from the engineering student ,how they are studying and doing their best . May be the professionals know, how they think the students should go during their study time. I am not talking about grades , I am just talking about geting good skills. Any suggestion please. Advance thanks.
 
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  • #2
I am also interested in what more experienced people have to say about this. I found that buying some electronics/robotics books and doing the small outlined projects helps. I am currently studying Robot Building for Begginers, but I don't have time to execute the project because of my heavy course load, but i did buy a bunch of resistors, capacitors, multi meter etc, so as soon as I have time to delve in i will. I would suggest you try something similar. You should also check out Arduino and familiarize yourself with programming.(I need to check it out too when i have time).

Best of luck.
 
  • #3
haxtor21 said:
I am also interested in what more experienced people have to say about this. I found that buying some electronics/robotics books and doing the small outlined projects helps. I am currently studying Robot Building for Begginers, but I don't have time to execute the project because of my heavy course load, but i did buy a bunch of resistors, capacitors, multi meter etc, so as soon as I have time to delve in i will. I would suggest you try something similar. You should also check out Arduino and familiarize yourself with programming.(I need to check it out too when i have time).

Best of luck.

Thanks . I also bought some of capacitors,diodes,transformers,multimetre etc. But I don't know about arduino.
 
  • #4
just tinker. use a combination of pen-and-paper design, software circuit simulation, breadboarding/building, and maybe matlab/scilab. do both analog and digital, power and signal. spend a lot of time reading datasheets and app notes. stay away from high power/voltage.
 
  • #5


As a scientist, my suggestion for studying electronics would be to focus on hands-on learning and practical application. This can be achieved through various methods such as:

1. Building and experimenting with circuits: This will not only help you understand the concepts better but also give you the opportunity to troubleshoot and problem solve when things don't work as expected.

2. Online tutorials and simulations: There are many online resources available that provide step-by-step tutorials and simulations for building and testing circuits. These can be a great way to supplement your textbook learning.

3. Joining a makerspace or electronics club: These are community spaces where people with similar interests come together to share knowledge and work on projects. This can be a great way to learn from others and get hands-on experience with different types of circuits.

4. Internships or part-time jobs in the electronics field: This will give you the opportunity to work with professionals and learn from their experience. You can also gain practical skills and knowledge that will be valuable in your future career.

Additionally, it's important to keep up with the latest developments and technologies in the field of electronics. This can be done by reading industry publications, attending workshops and conferences, and networking with professionals in the field.

Remember, practice and perseverance are key to developing good skills in electronics. Don't be afraid to make mistakes and keep experimenting to improve your understanding and skills. Best of luck in your studies!
 

Related to Any suggestion for mrthods of studying electronics?

What is the best way to learn about electronics?

The best way to learn about electronics is to start with the basics, such as Ohm's Law and circuit analysis. From there, you can move on to hands-on projects and experiments to gain practical experience. It is also helpful to read books and articles, watch tutorial videos, and attend workshops or classes.

Do I need a degree to study electronics?

No, a degree is not necessary to study electronics. However, having a degree in a related field such as electrical engineering or physics can be beneficial, as it provides a strong foundation in the principles of electronics.

What tools do I need for studying electronics?

Some essential tools for studying electronics include a breadboard, multimeter, soldering iron, and various electronic components such as resistors, capacitors, and transistors. Additionally, having access to a computer and software for designing and simulating circuits can be helpful.

Is there a specific order in which I should learn about electronics?

It is recommended to start with the basics and then gradually move on to more complex topics. It is also helpful to have a specific goal in mind, such as building a specific circuit or project, to guide your learning process.

How can I apply what I learn in electronics to real-world situations?

There are many real-world applications of electronics, from designing and building electronic devices to working in industries such as telecommunications, automotive, and aerospace. Additionally, understanding electronics can also be useful in everyday life, such as troubleshooting and repairing household appliances or creating DIY projects.

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