Archimedes Principle: B = δVg + T

In summary, when an object is submerged in water, there are three main forces acting on it: buoyancy force, gravitational force, and string force. The buoyancy force and gravitational force act in opposite directions, while the string force pulls the object upwards. The gravitational force is equal to the weight of the object, and the buoyancy force is dependent on the volume of the object and the density of the surrounding fluid. When taking an imaginary area out of a container of water, the forces acting on that area would include the buoyancy and gravitational forces.
  • #1
Kork
33
0
Hi :)

When I have a container with water and put a piece of metal down in the water while it's hanging on the string, I know that there will be two forces pulling it upwords:

B = δVg
and the string force T

But the force pulling it down, is that the gravitation? Or is it a force that equals to the weight of the piece of metal?
 
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  • #2
Kork said:
But the force pulling it down, is that the gravitation? Or is it a force that equals to the weight of the piece of metal?
Yes and yes. Gravity pulls the metal downward. (That gravitational force is the weight of the object.)
 
  • #3
I don't think I quite understand the buoyancy part.

If I tak a cointainer with water and take out an imaginaray area then the forces on the area would be the buoyancy and the gravitationa pulling down? Right?
 
  • #4
Thank you very much!
 
  • #5
Kork said:
I don't think I quite understand the buoyancy part.

If I tak a cointainer with water and take out an imaginaray area then the forces on the area would be the buoyancy and the gravitationa pulling down? Right?
Not sure what you mean by 'take out an imaginary area'. The forces on the submerged object will include the buoyant force and the weight of the object. (Maybe you can restate the question.)
 

Related to Archimedes Principle: B = δVg + T

What is Archimedes Principle?

Archimedes Principle is a scientific law that describes the relationship between the buoyant force on an object and the amount of fluid it displaces. It states that the buoyant force (B) on an object is equal to the weight of the fluid (δVg) that the object displaces, plus any additional tension force (T) acting on the object.

How is Archimedes Principle used in everyday life?

Archimedes Principle is used in many everyday situations, such as understanding why objects float or sink in water, determining the appropriate size and shape of a ship's hull, and designing hot air balloons. It also helps to explain why some objects, like icebergs, float partially submerged in water.

What is the significance of δVg in the Archimedes Principle equation?

In the equation B = δVg + T, δVg represents the weight of the fluid that the object displaces. This means that the more fluid an object displaces, the greater the buoyant force acting on it will be.

How does the density of an object affect its buoyancy?

The density of an object plays a crucial role in determining its buoyancy. An object with a higher density than the fluid it is placed in will sink, while an object with a lower density will float. This is because the amount of fluid displaced by the object will vary based on its density, which in turn affects the buoyant force acting on the object.

Can Archimedes Principle be applied to any fluid?

Yes, Archimedes Principle can be applied to any fluid, including gases. It is not limited to just liquids. This is because the principle is based on the properties of the fluid itself, such as its density and pressure, rather than the specific type of fluid.

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