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Are good scientists smart or do they study hard?

  1. Aug 28, 2013 #1
    Well obviously I'm not talking about mentally challenged people, but if two people are relatively distant in pure IQ tests (given the same initial education on abstract concepts that may aid such a test), will it play any significant role after a point? Will the smarter person ever be able to compete with a person that studied hard? Or will the person that studied hard ever have a real problem competing with a smarter person that studied little?
     
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  3. Aug 28, 2013 #2

    ZombieFeynman

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    From what I can tell, someone's IQ is essentially a measure of how well someone takes an IQ test.

    Why do you think the ability to take an IQ test correlates well with the ability to be a proficient scientist?
     
  4. Aug 28, 2013 #3
    " Are good scientists smart or do they study hard? "

    both,
    but the individual's brain capability is very important.
     
  5. Aug 28, 2013 #4

    jim hardy

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    "1% inspiration, 99% perspiration"

    something has to be pretty true to achieve platitude status.
     
  6. Aug 28, 2013 #5

    ZombieFeynman

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    Define brain capability. How can it be measured? Can you quantify your assessment of very important?
     
  7. Aug 28, 2013 #6

    reenmachine

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    probably both
     
  8. Aug 28, 2013 #7

    CompuChip

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    I think good scientists mainly become good scientists through hard work, education and experience. I feel that anyone with an interest in science and the proper training can be a pretty decent scientist.

    What discerns the greatest scientists, in my opinion, is that extra touch of intuition, hunch, brilliance, whatever you want to call it - these are things that cannot be learned. You either possess it or you don't, and only a few exceptional people do.
     
  9. Aug 28, 2013 #8
    hilarious,
    well, for one
    there's this thing called memory,
    it's function is to store info/data.
    which is a capability.

    it's very important since,
    everything pertains to human function is derived from the brain.

    dictionary
    " What is a Human's Cognitive Capability? "
    http://ergonomics.about.com/od/ergonomicbasics/f/What-Is-a-Human-Cognitive-Capability.htm

    " A component of Human Factors is a human’s cognitive capability. This is not just how smart people are but also how the brain works, how information is understood, how it is processed and how it is recalled. Cognition refers to higher level brain functions such as perception, planning, problem solving and using language. "

    edit-

    there's also this wikki page,
    Human brain
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_brain
     
  10. Aug 28, 2013 #9

    Pythagorean

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    That was a pretty pedantic post, krash 661, and you still didn't quantify anything. Lot's of qualifying though.
     
  11. Aug 28, 2013 #10
    dictionary,
    quantify
    qualify
    " Can you quantify your assessment of very important? ",

    " it's very important since,
    everything pertains to human function is derived from the brain. ",

    it's kind of that simple.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2013
  12. Aug 28, 2013 #11
    Nothing in his initial post required "quantifying". I'm guessing his second post was partially in jest because of ZombieFeynman's silly response. You and ZombieFeynman both come off as attempting to sound intelligent but your responses make no sense. I'm not sure what you don't understand about Krash's post but, I assure you, there is no "quantifying" necessary to understand his point.
     
  13. Aug 28, 2013 #12
    thanks :),
    i appreciate this.

    but if Pythagorean wants a number than
    infinity will fit.
     
  14. Aug 28, 2013 #13

    Pythagorean

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    I think the point that's been missed is that human intelligence is an incredibly nuanced subject and the analogy to computer memory is misplaced.
     
  15. Aug 28, 2013 #14
    for you to have all that neuroscience on your profile,
    it's odd that you would make comment's like this.
    weird.

    can i ask why you say " computer memory "
    i never said anything about a computer.
    but is it not obvious how similar a computer's memory or/and processor is to the human brain ?
     
  16. Aug 28, 2013 #15

    Pythagorean

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    "data being stored" is more about computer memory than any of the types of human memory.

    Computer and brains have some similarities, but the analogy gets carried too far because the nuances make people blind.
     
  17. Aug 28, 2013 #16

    ZapperZ

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    Closed, pending moderation.

    Zz.
     
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